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In vitro and in vivo antioxidant properties of different fractions of Moringa oleifera leaves.
Food Chem Toxicol. 2009 Sep; 47(9):2196-201.FC

Abstract

The antioxidant potency of different fractions of Moringa oleifera leaves were investigated by employing various established in vitro systems, such as beta-Carotene bleaching, reducing power, DPPH/superoxide/hydroxyl radical scavenging, ferrous ion chelation and lipid peroxidation. On the basis of in vitro antioxidant properties polyphenolic fraction of M. oleifera leaves (MOEF) was chosen as the potent fraction and used for the DNA nicking and in vivo antioxidant properties. MOEF shows concentration dependent protection of oxidative DNA damage induced by HO() and also found to inhibit the toxicity produced by CCl(4) administration as seen from the decreased lipid peroxides (LPO) and increased glutathione (GSH) levels. Among the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) levels were restored to almost normal levels compared to CCl(4) intoxicated rats. The HPLC analysis indicated the presence of phenolic acids (gallic, chlorogenic, ellagic and ferulic acid) and flavonoids (kaempferol, quercetin and rutin). Thus, it may be concluded that the MOEF possess high phenolic content and potent antioxidant properties, which may be mediated through direct trapping of the free radicals and also through metal chelation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Pharmacognosy and Ethnopharmacology Division, National Botanical Research Institute (CSIR), Rana Pratap Marg, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19520138

Citation

Verma, Arti R., et al. "In Vitro and in Vivo Antioxidant Properties of Different Fractions of Moringa Oleifera Leaves." Food and Chemical Toxicology : an International Journal Published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association, vol. 47, no. 9, 2009, pp. 2196-201.
Verma AR, Vijayakumar M, Mathela CS, et al. In vitro and in vivo antioxidant properties of different fractions of Moringa oleifera leaves. Food Chem Toxicol. 2009;47(9):2196-201.
Verma, A. R., Vijayakumar, M., Mathela, C. S., & Rao, C. V. (2009). In vitro and in vivo antioxidant properties of different fractions of Moringa oleifera leaves. Food and Chemical Toxicology : an International Journal Published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association, 47(9), 2196-201. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fct.2009.06.005
Verma AR, et al. In Vitro and in Vivo Antioxidant Properties of Different Fractions of Moringa Oleifera Leaves. Food Chem Toxicol. 2009;47(9):2196-201. PubMed PMID: 19520138.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - In vitro and in vivo antioxidant properties of different fractions of Moringa oleifera leaves. AU - Verma,Arti R, AU - Vijayakumar,M, AU - Mathela,Chandra S, AU - Rao,Chandana V, Y1 - 2009/06/09/ PY - 2009/03/06/received PY - 2009/05/14/revised PY - 2009/06/03/accepted PY - 2009/6/13/entrez PY - 2009/6/13/pubmed PY - 2009/10/14/medline SP - 2196 EP - 201 JF - Food and chemical toxicology : an international journal published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association JO - Food Chem Toxicol VL - 47 IS - 9 N2 - The antioxidant potency of different fractions of Moringa oleifera leaves were investigated by employing various established in vitro systems, such as beta-Carotene bleaching, reducing power, DPPH/superoxide/hydroxyl radical scavenging, ferrous ion chelation and lipid peroxidation. On the basis of in vitro antioxidant properties polyphenolic fraction of M. oleifera leaves (MOEF) was chosen as the potent fraction and used for the DNA nicking and in vivo antioxidant properties. MOEF shows concentration dependent protection of oxidative DNA damage induced by HO() and also found to inhibit the toxicity produced by CCl(4) administration as seen from the decreased lipid peroxides (LPO) and increased glutathione (GSH) levels. Among the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) levels were restored to almost normal levels compared to CCl(4) intoxicated rats. The HPLC analysis indicated the presence of phenolic acids (gallic, chlorogenic, ellagic and ferulic acid) and flavonoids (kaempferol, quercetin and rutin). Thus, it may be concluded that the MOEF possess high phenolic content and potent antioxidant properties, which may be mediated through direct trapping of the free radicals and also through metal chelation. SN - 1873-6351 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19520138/In_vitro_and_in_vivo_antioxidant_properties_of_different_fractions_of_Moringa_oleifera_leaves_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0278-6915(09)00277-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -