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Lidocaine given intravenously improves conditions for laryngeal mask airway insertion during propofol target-controlled infusion.
Eur J Anaesthesiol. 2009 May; 26(5):377-81.EJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE

Patient response to laryngeal mask airway insertion during propofol induction depends on many factors. Lidocaine has been used to reduce cardiovascular responses, coughing, and bucking induced by tracheal intubation. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of intravenous lidocaine on laryngeal mask airway insertion conditions during the induction of anaesthesia with propofol target-controlled infusion.

METHODS

Eighty patients, 16-54 years of age, weighing between 45 and 100 kg, who underwent minor surgery, were randomly divided into two groups (the lidocaine and control groups). Anaesthesia was induced with propofol target-controlled infusion at a target plasma concentration of 6 microg ml. The lidocaine group received 1.5 mg kg of lidocaine 50 s after starting target-controlled infusion and the control group received an equivalent volume of saline. Laryngeal mask airways were inserted when propofol effect-site concentrations reached 2.5 microg ml. Laryngeal mask airway insertion conditions (mouth opening, gagging, coughing, movements, laryngospasm, overall ease of insertion, and hiccups) were assessed, and haemodynamic responses were monitored for 3 min after laryngeal mask airway insertion.

RESULTS

No significant differences were observed between the two groups in terms of haemodynamic responses. However, the lidocaine group showed lower incidences of coughing (5 vs. 22.5%), gagging (25 vs. 55%), and laryngospasm (2.5 vs. 17.5%) (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSION

Pretreatment with intravenous lidocaine 1.5 mg kg during induction with propofol target-controlled infusion improves laryngeal mask airway insertion conditions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Anaesthesiology, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19521294

Citation

Baik, Hee Jung, et al. "Lidocaine Given Intravenously Improves Conditions for Laryngeal Mask Airway Insertion During Propofol Target-controlled Infusion." European Journal of Anaesthesiology, vol. 26, no. 5, 2009, pp. 377-81.
Baik HJ, Kim YJ, Kim JH. Lidocaine given intravenously improves conditions for laryngeal mask airway insertion during propofol target-controlled infusion. Eur J Anaesthesiol. 2009;26(5):377-81.
Baik, H. J., Kim, Y. J., & Kim, J. H. (2009). Lidocaine given intravenously improves conditions for laryngeal mask airway insertion during propofol target-controlled infusion. European Journal of Anaesthesiology, 26(5), 377-81. https://doi.org/10.1097/EJA.0b013e32831dcd4d
Baik HJ, Kim YJ, Kim JH. Lidocaine Given Intravenously Improves Conditions for Laryngeal Mask Airway Insertion During Propofol Target-controlled Infusion. Eur J Anaesthesiol. 2009;26(5):377-81. PubMed PMID: 19521294.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lidocaine given intravenously improves conditions for laryngeal mask airway insertion during propofol target-controlled infusion. AU - Baik,Hee Jung, AU - Kim,Youn Jin, AU - Kim,Jong Hak, PY - 2009/6/13/entrez PY - 2009/6/13/pubmed PY - 2009/9/10/medline SP - 377 EP - 81 JF - European journal of anaesthesiology JO - Eur J Anaesthesiol VL - 26 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Patient response to laryngeal mask airway insertion during propofol induction depends on many factors. Lidocaine has been used to reduce cardiovascular responses, coughing, and bucking induced by tracheal intubation. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of intravenous lidocaine on laryngeal mask airway insertion conditions during the induction of anaesthesia with propofol target-controlled infusion. METHODS: Eighty patients, 16-54 years of age, weighing between 45 and 100 kg, who underwent minor surgery, were randomly divided into two groups (the lidocaine and control groups). Anaesthesia was induced with propofol target-controlled infusion at a target plasma concentration of 6 microg ml. The lidocaine group received 1.5 mg kg of lidocaine 50 s after starting target-controlled infusion and the control group received an equivalent volume of saline. Laryngeal mask airways were inserted when propofol effect-site concentrations reached 2.5 microg ml. Laryngeal mask airway insertion conditions (mouth opening, gagging, coughing, movements, laryngospasm, overall ease of insertion, and hiccups) were assessed, and haemodynamic responses were monitored for 3 min after laryngeal mask airway insertion. RESULTS: No significant differences were observed between the two groups in terms of haemodynamic responses. However, the lidocaine group showed lower incidences of coughing (5 vs. 22.5%), gagging (25 vs. 55%), and laryngospasm (2.5 vs. 17.5%) (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Pretreatment with intravenous lidocaine 1.5 mg kg during induction with propofol target-controlled infusion improves laryngeal mask airway insertion conditions. SN - 1365-2346 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19521294/Lidocaine_given_intravenously_improves_conditions_for_laryngeal_mask_airway_insertion_during_propofol_target_controlled_infusion_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/EJA.0b013e32831dcd4d DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -