Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Serogroup-specific risk factors for Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infection in Australia.
Clin Infect Dis. 2009 Jul 15; 49(2):249-56.CI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is an important cause of foodborne illness. In Australia, risk factors for STEC infection have not been examined at a national level.

METHODS

We conducted a case-control study in 6 Australian jurisdictions from 2003 through 2007. A case patient was defined as a person from whom STEC was isolated or toxin production genes were detected in stool. Case patients were recruited from notifiable disease registers, and 3 control subjects frequency matched by age were selected from databases of controls. Using structured questionnaires, interviewers collected data on clinical illness, foods consumed, and exposures to potential environmental sources.

RESULTS

We recruited 43 case patients infected with STEC serogroup O157, 71 case patients infected with non-O157 serogroups, and 304 control subjects. One patient infected with serogroup O157 and 7 infected with non-O157 serogroups developed hemolytic uremic syndrome. Compared with control subjects, case patients infected with STEC O157 were more likely to eat hamburgers, visit restaurants, have previously used antibiotics, or have family occupational exposure to red meat. Case patients infected with non-O157 STEC were more likely to eat sliced chicken meat or corned beef from a delicatessen, camp in the bush, eat catered meals, or have family occupational exposure to animals. Negative associations were observed for certain foods, particularly homegrown vegetables, fruits, or herbs.

CONCLUSION

This study of risk factors for STEC infection by serogroup highlights risks associated with eating hamburgers and occupational handling of raw meat. To prevent infection, hamburgers must be cooked thoroughly, and people handling raw meat or who have close contact with animals must ensure adequate hygiene.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Health, OzFoodNet, South Australia, Adelaide, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19522658

Citation

McPherson, Michelle, et al. "Serogroup-specific Risk Factors for Shiga Toxin-producing Escherichia Coli Infection in Australia." Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, vol. 49, no. 2, 2009, pp. 249-56.
McPherson M, Lalor K, Combs B, et al. Serogroup-specific risk factors for Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infection in Australia. Clin Infect Dis. 2009;49(2):249-56.
McPherson, M., Lalor, K., Combs, B., Raupach, J., Stafford, R., & Kirk, M. D. (2009). Serogroup-specific risk factors for Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infection in Australia. Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, 49(2), 249-56. https://doi.org/10.1086/599370
McPherson M, et al. Serogroup-specific Risk Factors for Shiga Toxin-producing Escherichia Coli Infection in Australia. Clin Infect Dis. 2009 Jul 15;49(2):249-56. PubMed PMID: 19522658.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Serogroup-specific risk factors for Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infection in Australia. AU - McPherson,Michelle, AU - Lalor,Karin, AU - Combs,Barry, AU - Raupach,Jane, AU - Stafford,Russell, AU - Kirk,Martyn D, PY - 2009/6/16/entrez PY - 2009/6/16/pubmed PY - 2009/8/4/medline SP - 249 EP - 56 JF - Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America JO - Clin Infect Dis VL - 49 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is an important cause of foodborne illness. In Australia, risk factors for STEC infection have not been examined at a national level. METHODS: We conducted a case-control study in 6 Australian jurisdictions from 2003 through 2007. A case patient was defined as a person from whom STEC was isolated or toxin production genes were detected in stool. Case patients were recruited from notifiable disease registers, and 3 control subjects frequency matched by age were selected from databases of controls. Using structured questionnaires, interviewers collected data on clinical illness, foods consumed, and exposures to potential environmental sources. RESULTS: We recruited 43 case patients infected with STEC serogroup O157, 71 case patients infected with non-O157 serogroups, and 304 control subjects. One patient infected with serogroup O157 and 7 infected with non-O157 serogroups developed hemolytic uremic syndrome. Compared with control subjects, case patients infected with STEC O157 were more likely to eat hamburgers, visit restaurants, have previously used antibiotics, or have family occupational exposure to red meat. Case patients infected with non-O157 STEC were more likely to eat sliced chicken meat or corned beef from a delicatessen, camp in the bush, eat catered meals, or have family occupational exposure to animals. Negative associations were observed for certain foods, particularly homegrown vegetables, fruits, or herbs. CONCLUSION: This study of risk factors for STEC infection by serogroup highlights risks associated with eating hamburgers and occupational handling of raw meat. To prevent infection, hamburgers must be cooked thoroughly, and people handling raw meat or who have close contact with animals must ensure adequate hygiene. SN - 1537-6591 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19522658/Serogroup_specific_risk_factors_for_Shiga_toxin_producing_Escherichia_coli_infection_in_Australia_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/cid/article-lookup/doi/10.1086/599370 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -