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Dietary docosahexaenoic acid but not arachidonic acid influences central nervous system fatty acid status in baboon neonates.
Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids 2009 Aug-Sep; 81(2-3):105-10PL

Abstract

The influence of dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) and arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6) on infant central nervous system (CNS) composition has implications for neural development, including vision, cognition, and motor function. We consider here combined results of three published studies of DHA/AA-containing formulas and breastfeeding to evaluate the CNS tissue response of baboon neonates with varied concentration and duration of DHA/AA consumption [G.Y. Diau, A.T. Hsieh, E.A. Sarkadi-Nagy, V. Wijendran, P.W. Nathanielsz, J.T. Brenna, The influence of long chain polyunsaturate supplementation on docosahexaenoic acid and arachidonic acid in baboon neonate central nervous system, BMC Med. 3 (2005) 11; A.T. Hsieh, J.C. Anthony, D.A. Diersen-Schade, et al., The influence of moderate and high dietary long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) on baboon neonate tissue fatty acids, Pediatr. Res. 61 (2007) 537-45; E. Sarkadi-Nagy, V. Wijendran, G.Y. Diau, et al., The influence of prematurity and long chain polyunsaturate supplementation in 4-week adjusted age baboon neonate brain and related tissues, Pediatr. Res. 54 (2003) 244-252]. A total of 43 neonates born spontaneously at term, or preterm by Cesarean section, consumed diets with DHA-AA (%w/w) at several levels: none (0,0), moderate (0.3, 0.6), or high (>0.6, 0.67 or 1.2). CNS fatty acids were analyzed at 4 and 12 weeks postpartum for term baboons and 7.5 weeks for preterm neonates. CNS DHA was consistently greater by 5-30% in neonates consuming DHA and nearer 30% for cortex. In contrast, CNS AA was unaffected by dietary AA and decreased in all structures with age. Dietary DHA consistently supports greater CNS DHA and maintenance of cortex DHA concentration with feeding duration, while CNS AA is not related to dietary supply. These data on structure-specific LCPUFA accretion may provide insight into neural mechanisms responsible for suboptimal functional outcomes in infants consuming diets that do not support the highest tissue DHA levels.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19524425

Citation

Hsieh, Andrea T., and J Thomas Brenna. "Dietary Docosahexaenoic Acid but Not Arachidonic Acid Influences Central Nervous System Fatty Acid Status in Baboon Neonates." Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes, and Essential Fatty Acids, vol. 81, no. 2-3, 2009, pp. 105-10.
Hsieh AT, Brenna JT. Dietary docosahexaenoic acid but not arachidonic acid influences central nervous system fatty acid status in baboon neonates. Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids. 2009;81(2-3):105-10.
Hsieh, A. T., & Brenna, J. T. (2009). Dietary docosahexaenoic acid but not arachidonic acid influences central nervous system fatty acid status in baboon neonates. Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes, and Essential Fatty Acids, 81(2-3), pp. 105-10. doi:10.1016/j.plefa.2009.05.012.
Hsieh AT, Brenna JT. Dietary Docosahexaenoic Acid but Not Arachidonic Acid Influences Central Nervous System Fatty Acid Status in Baboon Neonates. Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids. 2009;81(2-3):105-10. PubMed PMID: 19524425.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary docosahexaenoic acid but not arachidonic acid influences central nervous system fatty acid status in baboon neonates. AU - Hsieh,Andrea T, AU - Brenna,J Thomas, Y1 - 2009/06/12/ PY - 2009/6/16/entrez PY - 2009/6/16/pubmed PY - 2009/12/16/medline SP - 105 EP - 10 JF - Prostaglandins, leukotrienes, and essential fatty acids JO - Prostaglandins Leukot. Essent. Fatty Acids VL - 81 IS - 2-3 N2 - The influence of dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) and arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6) on infant central nervous system (CNS) composition has implications for neural development, including vision, cognition, and motor function. We consider here combined results of three published studies of DHA/AA-containing formulas and breastfeeding to evaluate the CNS tissue response of baboon neonates with varied concentration and duration of DHA/AA consumption [G.Y. Diau, A.T. Hsieh, E.A. Sarkadi-Nagy, V. Wijendran, P.W. Nathanielsz, J.T. Brenna, The influence of long chain polyunsaturate supplementation on docosahexaenoic acid and arachidonic acid in baboon neonate central nervous system, BMC Med. 3 (2005) 11; A.T. Hsieh, J.C. Anthony, D.A. Diersen-Schade, et al., The influence of moderate and high dietary long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) on baboon neonate tissue fatty acids, Pediatr. Res. 61 (2007) 537-45; E. Sarkadi-Nagy, V. Wijendran, G.Y. Diau, et al., The influence of prematurity and long chain polyunsaturate supplementation in 4-week adjusted age baboon neonate brain and related tissues, Pediatr. Res. 54 (2003) 244-252]. A total of 43 neonates born spontaneously at term, or preterm by Cesarean section, consumed diets with DHA-AA (%w/w) at several levels: none (0,0), moderate (0.3, 0.6), or high (>0.6, 0.67 or 1.2). CNS fatty acids were analyzed at 4 and 12 weeks postpartum for term baboons and 7.5 weeks for preterm neonates. CNS DHA was consistently greater by 5-30% in neonates consuming DHA and nearer 30% for cortex. In contrast, CNS AA was unaffected by dietary AA and decreased in all structures with age. Dietary DHA consistently supports greater CNS DHA and maintenance of cortex DHA concentration with feeding duration, while CNS AA is not related to dietary supply. These data on structure-specific LCPUFA accretion may provide insight into neural mechanisms responsible for suboptimal functional outcomes in infants consuming diets that do not support the highest tissue DHA levels. SN - 1532-2823 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19524425/Dietary_docosahexaenoic_acid_but_not_arachidonic_acid_influences_central_nervous_system_fatty_acid_status_in_baboon_neonates_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0952-3278(09)00101-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -