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Small bowel endoscopic enteral access.
Curr Opin Gastroenterol. 2009 Mar; 25(2):155-9.CO

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW

Small bowel endoscopic enteral access is perceived as difficult. However, small bowel access is necessary for patients who are unable to tolerate gastric feedings. This review discusses the successes and challenges involved with endoscopic small bowel tube placement in various populations using a variety of placement techniques.

RECENT FINDINGS

In general, direct percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy (DPEJ) is becoming a more common procedure performed to obtain small bowel enteral access. BMI may be a useful predictor of DPEJ tube placement success and complication rates. A retrospective review determined that DPEJ tube placement significantly decreased the incidence of aspiration pneumonia in patients with previous recurrent aspiration pneumonia episodes. DPEJ is an effective method of providing enteral nutrition for patients when percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is not indicated because of anatomical or gastric function abnormalities. However, there are known complications of DPEJ, including small bowel volvulus. Nasojejunal tubes also can provide enteral access to the small intestine. Endoscopic insertion of nasojejunal tubes promotes decreased length of hospital stay and early initiation of enteral feedings as compared with bedside self-migrating jejunal tubes in patients with severe acute pancreatitis. Endoscopically placed small bowel feeding tubes can safely deliver enteral nutrition to patients when gastric feedings are not indicated.

SUMMARY

Continued evaluation of endoscopic jejunal tube placement methods and associated clinical outcomes in assorted populations is necessary to determine the safest and most effective technique.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Digestive Disease Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19528883

Citation

Freeman, Cecilia, and Mark H. Delegge. "Small Bowel Endoscopic Enteral Access." Current Opinion in Gastroenterology, vol. 25, no. 2, 2009, pp. 155-9.
Freeman C, Delegge MH. Small bowel endoscopic enteral access. Curr Opin Gastroenterol. 2009;25(2):155-9.
Freeman, C., & Delegge, M. H. (2009). Small bowel endoscopic enteral access. Current Opinion in Gastroenterology, 25(2), 155-9. https://doi.org/10.1097/MOG.0b013e328324f86b
Freeman C, Delegge MH. Small Bowel Endoscopic Enteral Access. Curr Opin Gastroenterol. 2009;25(2):155-9. PubMed PMID: 19528883.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Small bowel endoscopic enteral access. AU - Freeman,Cecilia, AU - Delegge,Mark H, PY - 2009/6/17/entrez PY - 2009/6/17/pubmed PY - 2009/7/25/medline SP - 155 EP - 9 JF - Current opinion in gastroenterology JO - Curr. Opin. Gastroenterol. VL - 25 IS - 2 N2 - PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Small bowel endoscopic enteral access is perceived as difficult. However, small bowel access is necessary for patients who are unable to tolerate gastric feedings. This review discusses the successes and challenges involved with endoscopic small bowel tube placement in various populations using a variety of placement techniques. RECENT FINDINGS: In general, direct percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy (DPEJ) is becoming a more common procedure performed to obtain small bowel enteral access. BMI may be a useful predictor of DPEJ tube placement success and complication rates. A retrospective review determined that DPEJ tube placement significantly decreased the incidence of aspiration pneumonia in patients with previous recurrent aspiration pneumonia episodes. DPEJ is an effective method of providing enteral nutrition for patients when percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is not indicated because of anatomical or gastric function abnormalities. However, there are known complications of DPEJ, including small bowel volvulus. Nasojejunal tubes also can provide enteral access to the small intestine. Endoscopic insertion of nasojejunal tubes promotes decreased length of hospital stay and early initiation of enteral feedings as compared with bedside self-migrating jejunal tubes in patients with severe acute pancreatitis. Endoscopically placed small bowel feeding tubes can safely deliver enteral nutrition to patients when gastric feedings are not indicated. SUMMARY: Continued evaluation of endoscopic jejunal tube placement methods and associated clinical outcomes in assorted populations is necessary to determine the safest and most effective technique. SN - 1531-7056 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19528883/Small_bowel_endoscopic_enteral_access_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MOG.0b013e328324f86b DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -