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Racial/ethnic differences in blood pressure control and medication utilization in a cohort of older veterans with dementia.
Am J Ther. 2010 Jan-Feb; 17(1):34-41.AJ

Abstract

Hypertension and dementia are common illnesses in geriatric patients, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to investigate racial and ethnic differences in blood pressure control and medication utilization in veterans aged 65 years or older with a diagnosis of both hypertension and dementia. We conducted a retrospective chart review for such veterans who attended the Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center outpatient clinics in Houston, Texas, during the period of October 1, 2003, to September 30, 2004. A total of 304 patients (190 Caucasians and 114 African-Americans) were included in the study. The mean number of concurrent antihypertensive medications for African-Americans was higher than for Caucasians (3.2 and 2.8, respectively; P = 0.02). African-American ethnicity was associated with higher use of thiazide diuretics (P = 0.02), dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers (P = 0.04), and clonidine (P = 0.01) than was Caucasian ethnicity. Forty-eight percent of African-Americans achieved adequate blood pressure control, compared with 59% of Caucasians. Mini-mental state exam scores were lower for African-Americans than for Caucasians (17.8 and 21.6, respectively; P = 0.01). The utilization of dementia medications was not found to be different between African-Americans and Caucasians. Veterans in this cohort achieved better blood pressure control than previously reported in other studies consisting of older patients. Physicians might have considered patients' race when prescribing antihypertensive medications reflected by the higher use of thiazide diuretics and calcium channel blockers for African-Americans.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Pharmacy Practice Department, Texas Southern University, Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center, Houston, USA. chui_io@tsu.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19535967

Citation

Poon, Ivy, et al. "Racial/ethnic Differences in Blood Pressure Control and Medication Utilization in a Cohort of Older Veterans With Dementia." American Journal of Therapeutics, vol. 17, no. 1, 2010, pp. 34-41.
Poon I, Lal LS, Ford ME, et al. Racial/ethnic differences in blood pressure control and medication utilization in a cohort of older veterans with dementia. Am J Ther. 2010;17(1):34-41.
Poon, I., Lal, L. S., Ford, M. E., & Braun, U. K. (2010). Racial/ethnic differences in blood pressure control and medication utilization in a cohort of older veterans with dementia. American Journal of Therapeutics, 17(1), 34-41. https://doi.org/10.1097/MJT.0b013e318197eaa3
Poon I, et al. Racial/ethnic Differences in Blood Pressure Control and Medication Utilization in a Cohort of Older Veterans With Dementia. Am J Ther. 2010 Jan-Feb;17(1):34-41. PubMed PMID: 19535967.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Racial/ethnic differences in blood pressure control and medication utilization in a cohort of older veterans with dementia. AU - Poon,Ivy, AU - Lal,Lincy S, AU - Ford,Marvella E, AU - Braun,Ursula K, PY - 2009/6/19/entrez PY - 2009/6/19/pubmed PY - 2010/3/4/medline SP - 34 EP - 41 JF - American journal of therapeutics JO - Am J Ther VL - 17 IS - 1 N2 - Hypertension and dementia are common illnesses in geriatric patients, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to investigate racial and ethnic differences in blood pressure control and medication utilization in veterans aged 65 years or older with a diagnosis of both hypertension and dementia. We conducted a retrospective chart review for such veterans who attended the Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center outpatient clinics in Houston, Texas, during the period of October 1, 2003, to September 30, 2004. A total of 304 patients (190 Caucasians and 114 African-Americans) were included in the study. The mean number of concurrent antihypertensive medications for African-Americans was higher than for Caucasians (3.2 and 2.8, respectively; P = 0.02). African-American ethnicity was associated with higher use of thiazide diuretics (P = 0.02), dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers (P = 0.04), and clonidine (P = 0.01) than was Caucasian ethnicity. Forty-eight percent of African-Americans achieved adequate blood pressure control, compared with 59% of Caucasians. Mini-mental state exam scores were lower for African-Americans than for Caucasians (17.8 and 21.6, respectively; P = 0.01). The utilization of dementia medications was not found to be different between African-Americans and Caucasians. Veterans in this cohort achieved better blood pressure control than previously reported in other studies consisting of older patients. Physicians might have considered patients' race when prescribing antihypertensive medications reflected by the higher use of thiazide diuretics and calcium channel blockers for African-Americans. SN - 1536-3686 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19535967/Racial/ethnic_differences_in_blood_pressure_control_and_medication_utilization_in_a_cohort_of_older_veterans_with_dementia_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=19535967.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -