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Age and time trends in fish consumption pattern of children and adolescents, and consequences for the intake of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2009 Sep; 63(9):1071-5.EJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES

There is a lack of detailed data on fish consumption in European children and adolescents. We therefore investigated fish consumption patterns, portion sizes and estimated intakes of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA; eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid).

SUBJECTS/METHODS

From the Dortmund Nutritional and Anthropometric Longitudinally Designed study between 1985 and 2006, yearly 3-day weighed dietary records (N=7152) from 1024 subjects (2-18 years, 49% males) were evaluated.

RESULTS

On 14% of total recorded days fish consumption from 33 different species was documented. In the total sample (in the subgroup with fish intake), mean fish intake almost doubled from 5 to 14 g per day (from 15 to 37 g per day) within the age range. Mean portions of fish increased from 40 to 89 g per portion, predominantly from low-fat fish species. In the total sample mean long-chain (LC) n-3 PUFA intake increased with age from 42 to 141 mg per day (100-324 mg per day in the subgroup with fish intake). Without any fish consumption in the recording period, n-3 LC PUFA intake ranged below 20 mg per day. Within the 20-year time frame, the frequency of fish consumption increased significantly (P<0.0282) from 35% at the start in 1985 to 40% in 2005.

CONCLUSIONS

Fish consumption-even with low intakes as observed here-improves LC n-3 PUFA considerably. Owing to the very low preference for high-fat fish in our sample, the potential of fish intake as an LC n-3 PUFA source was not considered.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Research Institute of Child Nutrition (FKE), Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität, Bonn, Germany. sichert@fke-do.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19536160

Citation

Sichert-Hellert, W, et al. "Age and Time Trends in Fish Consumption Pattern of Children and Adolescents, and Consequences for the Intake of Long-chain N-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids." European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 63, no. 9, 2009, pp. 1071-5.
Sichert-Hellert W, Wicher M, Kersting M. Age and time trends in fish consumption pattern of children and adolescents, and consequences for the intake of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2009;63(9):1071-5.
Sichert-Hellert, W., Wicher, M., & Kersting, M. (2009). Age and time trends in fish consumption pattern of children and adolescents, and consequences for the intake of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 63(9), 1071-5. https://doi.org/10.1038/ejcn.2009.40
Sichert-Hellert W, Wicher M, Kersting M. Age and Time Trends in Fish Consumption Pattern of Children and Adolescents, and Consequences for the Intake of Long-chain N-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2009;63(9):1071-5. PubMed PMID: 19536160.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Age and time trends in fish consumption pattern of children and adolescents, and consequences for the intake of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. AU - Sichert-Hellert,W, AU - Wicher,M, AU - Kersting,M, Y1 - 2009/06/17/ PY - 2009/6/19/entrez PY - 2009/6/19/pubmed PY - 2009/11/11/medline SP - 1071 EP - 5 JF - European journal of clinical nutrition JO - Eur J Clin Nutr VL - 63 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: There is a lack of detailed data on fish consumption in European children and adolescents. We therefore investigated fish consumption patterns, portion sizes and estimated intakes of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA; eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid). SUBJECTS/METHODS: From the Dortmund Nutritional and Anthropometric Longitudinally Designed study between 1985 and 2006, yearly 3-day weighed dietary records (N=7152) from 1024 subjects (2-18 years, 49% males) were evaluated. RESULTS: On 14% of total recorded days fish consumption from 33 different species was documented. In the total sample (in the subgroup with fish intake), mean fish intake almost doubled from 5 to 14 g per day (from 15 to 37 g per day) within the age range. Mean portions of fish increased from 40 to 89 g per portion, predominantly from low-fat fish species. In the total sample mean long-chain (LC) n-3 PUFA intake increased with age from 42 to 141 mg per day (100-324 mg per day in the subgroup with fish intake). Without any fish consumption in the recording period, n-3 LC PUFA intake ranged below 20 mg per day. Within the 20-year time frame, the frequency of fish consumption increased significantly (P<0.0282) from 35% at the start in 1985 to 40% in 2005. CONCLUSIONS: Fish consumption-even with low intakes as observed here-improves LC n-3 PUFA considerably. Owing to the very low preference for high-fat fish in our sample, the potential of fish intake as an LC n-3 PUFA source was not considered. SN - 1476-5640 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19536160/Age_and_time_trends_in_fish_consumption_pattern_of_children_and_adolescents_and_consequences_for_the_intake_of_long_chain_n_3_polyunsaturated_fatty_acids_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/ejcn.2009.40 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -