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Disparities in self-monitoring of blood glucose among low-income ethnic minority populations with diabetes, United States.
Ethn Dis. 2009 Spring; 19(2):97-103.ED

Abstract

BACKGROUND

In adults with insulin-treated diabetes, self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) rates may be lower in minority or low-income populations, but the effect of income on racial/ethnic differences in SMBG is unknown.

METHODS

We assessed whether racial/ethnic differences in SMBG vary by income among adults with insulin-treated diabetes by using Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data from 2000 through 2004. We measured the prevalence of SMBG at least once per day among 16,630 adults aged > or = 19 years with insulin-treated diabetes.

RESULTS

At incomes > or = $20,000, Hispanics and non-Hispanic Blacks reported similar but lower SMBG rates than did non-Hispanic Whites (78%, 77%, 85%; P < or = .01). However, among those with income < $20,000, Hispanics performed SMBG substantially less than did Blacks or Whites (65%, 79%, 85%; P < or = .01). Racial/ ethnic differences in SMBC persisted after adjustment for age, sex, education, health insurance, health status, survey period, and diabetes measures. Receipt of diabetes education varied significantly by race/ethnicity in the income < $20,000 group only (Hispanics 49%, Blacks 64%, Whites 62%; P < .001). Low-income Hispanics with limited English proficiency had lower SMBG and diabetes education rates than did those with English proficiency (61% vs 79% and 44% vs 58%, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS

Among US adults with insulin-treated diabetes, Hispanics and Blacks performed daily SMBG less frequently than did Whites. Stratification by income revealed a disparity gradient in the income < $20,000 group: SMBG rates decreased from Whites to Blacks to Hispanics. Low-income Hispanics with limited English proficiency are at greater risk for reduced SMBG than are those proficient in English.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of General Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Ohio State University; 466 Cunz Hall, 1841 Neil Ave, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. dlevine@cph.osu.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19537217

Citation

Levine, Deborah A., et al. "Disparities in Self-monitoring of Blood Glucose Among Low-income Ethnic Minority Populations With Diabetes, United States." Ethnicity & Disease, vol. 19, no. 2, 2009, pp. 97-103.
Levine DA, Allison JJ, Cherrington A, et al. Disparities in self-monitoring of blood glucose among low-income ethnic minority populations with diabetes, United States. Ethn Dis. 2009;19(2):97-103.
Levine, D. A., Allison, J. J., Cherrington, A., Richman, J., Scarinci, I. C., & Houston, T. K. (2009). Disparities in self-monitoring of blood glucose among low-income ethnic minority populations with diabetes, United States. Ethnicity & Disease, 19(2), 97-103.
Levine DA, et al. Disparities in Self-monitoring of Blood Glucose Among Low-income Ethnic Minority Populations With Diabetes, United States. Ethn Dis. 2009;19(2):97-103. PubMed PMID: 19537217.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Disparities in self-monitoring of blood glucose among low-income ethnic minority populations with diabetes, United States. AU - Levine,Deborah A, AU - Allison,Jeroan J, AU - Cherrington,Andrea, AU - Richman,Joshua, AU - Scarinci,Isabel C, AU - Houston,Thomas K, PY - 2009/6/20/entrez PY - 2009/6/20/pubmed PY - 2009/7/30/medline SP - 97 EP - 103 JF - Ethnicity & disease JO - Ethn Dis VL - 19 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: In adults with insulin-treated diabetes, self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) rates may be lower in minority or low-income populations, but the effect of income on racial/ethnic differences in SMBG is unknown. METHODS: We assessed whether racial/ethnic differences in SMBG vary by income among adults with insulin-treated diabetes by using Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data from 2000 through 2004. We measured the prevalence of SMBG at least once per day among 16,630 adults aged > or = 19 years with insulin-treated diabetes. RESULTS: At incomes > or = $20,000, Hispanics and non-Hispanic Blacks reported similar but lower SMBG rates than did non-Hispanic Whites (78%, 77%, 85%; P < or = .01). However, among those with income < $20,000, Hispanics performed SMBG substantially less than did Blacks or Whites (65%, 79%, 85%; P < or = .01). Racial/ ethnic differences in SMBC persisted after adjustment for age, sex, education, health insurance, health status, survey period, and diabetes measures. Receipt of diabetes education varied significantly by race/ethnicity in the income < $20,000 group only (Hispanics 49%, Blacks 64%, Whites 62%; P < .001). Low-income Hispanics with limited English proficiency had lower SMBG and diabetes education rates than did those with English proficiency (61% vs 79% and 44% vs 58%, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Among US adults with insulin-treated diabetes, Hispanics and Blacks performed daily SMBG less frequently than did Whites. Stratification by income revealed a disparity gradient in the income < $20,000 group: SMBG rates decreased from Whites to Blacks to Hispanics. Low-income Hispanics with limited English proficiency are at greater risk for reduced SMBG than are those proficient in English. SN - 1049-510X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19537217/Disparities_in_self_monitoring_of_blood_glucose_among_low_income_ethnic_minority_populations_with_diabetes_United_States_ L2 - https://ClinicalTrials.gov/search/term=19537217 [PUBMED-IDS] DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -