Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Challenges of illness in metastatic breast cancer: a low-income African American perspective.
Palliat Support Care. 2009 Jun; 7(2):143-52.PS

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Disparities in breast cancer survival and treatment for African American and low income women are well documented, yet poorly understood. As care for women with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) evolves to a chronic care model, any inequities in optimal treatment and management of symptoms must also be identified and eliminated. The purpose of this study was to explore how race and income status influence women's experiences with MBC, particularly the management of symptoms, by describing the perceived challenges and barriers to achieving optimal symptom management among women with MBC and exploring whether the perceived challenges and barriers differed according to race or income.

METHOD

Quantitative techniques were used to assess demographics, clinical characteristics, symptom distress, and quality of life and to classify women into groups according to race and income. Qualitative techniques were used to explore the perceived challenges, barriers, and potential influences of race and income on management of symptoms in a prospective sample of 48 women with MBC.

RESULTS

Commonalities of themes across all groups were faith, hope, and progressive loss. Low-income African American women uniquely experienced greater physical and social distress and more uncertainty about treatment and treatment goals than the other delineated racial and economic groups.

SIGNIFICANCE OF RESULTS

There are many commonalities to the challenges of illness presented to women with MBC. There are also interesting, emerging thematic racial and economic differences, most compelling among the low income African American women with resultant practice and research implications.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261, USA. mros@pitt.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19538796

Citation

Rosenzweig, Margaret Quinn, et al. "Challenges of Illness in Metastatic Breast Cancer: a Low-income African American Perspective." Palliative & Supportive Care, vol. 7, no. 2, 2009, pp. 143-52.
Rosenzweig MQ, Wiehagen T, Brufsky A, et al. Challenges of illness in metastatic breast cancer: a low-income African American perspective. Palliat Support Care. 2009;7(2):143-52.
Rosenzweig, M. Q., Wiehagen, T., Brufsky, A., & Arnold, R. (2009). Challenges of illness in metastatic breast cancer: a low-income African American perspective. Palliative & Supportive Care, 7(2), 143-52. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1478951509000194
Rosenzweig MQ, et al. Challenges of Illness in Metastatic Breast Cancer: a Low-income African American Perspective. Palliat Support Care. 2009;7(2):143-52. PubMed PMID: 19538796.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Challenges of illness in metastatic breast cancer: a low-income African American perspective. AU - Rosenzweig,Margaret Quinn, AU - Wiehagen,Theresa, AU - Brufsky,Adam, AU - Arnold,Robert, PY - 2009/6/23/entrez PY - 2009/6/23/pubmed PY - 2009/8/22/medline SP - 143 EP - 52 JF - Palliative & supportive care JO - Palliat Support Care VL - 7 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Disparities in breast cancer survival and treatment for African American and low income women are well documented, yet poorly understood. As care for women with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) evolves to a chronic care model, any inequities in optimal treatment and management of symptoms must also be identified and eliminated. The purpose of this study was to explore how race and income status influence women's experiences with MBC, particularly the management of symptoms, by describing the perceived challenges and barriers to achieving optimal symptom management among women with MBC and exploring whether the perceived challenges and barriers differed according to race or income. METHOD: Quantitative techniques were used to assess demographics, clinical characteristics, symptom distress, and quality of life and to classify women into groups according to race and income. Qualitative techniques were used to explore the perceived challenges, barriers, and potential influences of race and income on management of symptoms in a prospective sample of 48 women with MBC. RESULTS: Commonalities of themes across all groups were faith, hope, and progressive loss. Low-income African American women uniquely experienced greater physical and social distress and more uncertainty about treatment and treatment goals than the other delineated racial and economic groups. SIGNIFICANCE OF RESULTS: There are many commonalities to the challenges of illness presented to women with MBC. There are also interesting, emerging thematic racial and economic differences, most compelling among the low income African American women with resultant practice and research implications. SN - 1478-9523 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19538796/Challenges_of_illness_in_metastatic_breast_cancer:_a_low_income_African_American_perspective_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S1478951509000194/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -