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Typhus and other rickettsioses: emerging infections in Germany.
Dtsch Arztebl Int. 2009 May; 106(20):348-54.DA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Rickettsioses are diseases caused by rickettsiae, obligate intracellular bacteria that are transmitted by arthropods to humans. They cause various types of spotted fever and typhus.

METHODS

A review of the literature is presented along with the authors' own findings.

RESULTS

Six indigenous species of rickettsiae have been found in Germany to date, five of which have been described as human pathogens in other countries. Rickettsia slovaca causes tick-borne lymphadenitis (TIBOLA). Rickettsia helvetica is a known pathogen of nonspecific fever; its role in endocarditis is still under investigation. Rickettsia felis causes so-called flea-borne spotted fever. Rickettsia monacensis and Rickettsia massiliae were recently shown to cause the classical form of tick-borne spotted fever. The sixth indigenous species in Germany, Rickettsia sp. RpA4, has not yet been associated with any human disease. The most important rickettsioses imported to Germany by travelers are African tick bite fever and Mediterranean spotted fever.

CONCLUSIONS

Modern molecular biological techniques have enabled the detection of a number of rickettsial species in Germany. The medical importance of these illnesses in Germany remains to be determined. In travel medicine, imported rickettsioses play a role that should not be underestimated.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institut für Mikrobiologie der Bundeswehr, München, Germany. gerharddobler@bundeswehr.orgNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19547738

Citation

Dobler, Gerhard, and Roman Wölfel. "Typhus and Other Rickettsioses: Emerging Infections in Germany." Deutsches Arzteblatt International, vol. 106, no. 20, 2009, pp. 348-54.
Dobler G, Wölfel R. Typhus and other rickettsioses: emerging infections in Germany. Dtsch Arztebl Int. 2009;106(20):348-54.
Dobler, G., & Wölfel, R. (2009). Typhus and other rickettsioses: emerging infections in Germany. Deutsches Arzteblatt International, 106(20), 348-54. https://doi.org/10.3238/arztebl.2009.0348
Dobler G, Wölfel R. Typhus and Other Rickettsioses: Emerging Infections in Germany. Dtsch Arztebl Int. 2009;106(20):348-54. PubMed PMID: 19547738.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Typhus and other rickettsioses: emerging infections in Germany. AU - Dobler,Gerhard, AU - Wölfel,Roman, Y1 - 2009/05/15/ PY - 2008/07/09/received PY - 2009/01/14/accepted PY - 2009/6/24/entrez PY - 2009/6/24/pubmed PY - 2009/9/4/medline KW - head lice KW - molecular biology KW - parasitosis KW - rickettsiosis KW - tick bite SP - 348 EP - 54 JF - Deutsches Arzteblatt international JO - Dtsch Arztebl Int VL - 106 IS - 20 N2 - BACKGROUND: Rickettsioses are diseases caused by rickettsiae, obligate intracellular bacteria that are transmitted by arthropods to humans. They cause various types of spotted fever and typhus. METHODS: A review of the literature is presented along with the authors' own findings. RESULTS: Six indigenous species of rickettsiae have been found in Germany to date, five of which have been described as human pathogens in other countries. Rickettsia slovaca causes tick-borne lymphadenitis (TIBOLA). Rickettsia helvetica is a known pathogen of nonspecific fever; its role in endocarditis is still under investigation. Rickettsia felis causes so-called flea-borne spotted fever. Rickettsia monacensis and Rickettsia massiliae were recently shown to cause the classical form of tick-borne spotted fever. The sixth indigenous species in Germany, Rickettsia sp. RpA4, has not yet been associated with any human disease. The most important rickettsioses imported to Germany by travelers are African tick bite fever and Mediterranean spotted fever. CONCLUSIONS: Modern molecular biological techniques have enabled the detection of a number of rickettsial species in Germany. The medical importance of these illnesses in Germany remains to be determined. In travel medicine, imported rickettsioses play a role that should not be underestimated. SN - 1866-0452 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19547738/Typhus_and_other_rickettsioses:_emerging_infections_in_Germany_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.3238/arztebl.2009.0348 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -