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Parental influence and effects of pro-smoking media messages on adolescents in Oklahoma.
J Okla State Med Assoc. 2009 May; 102(5):147-51.JO

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

This study analyzes the important and influential role that parents can play in modifying adolescents' smoking behavior after being exposed to pro-smoking messages seen in the media.

METHODS

We used data from the Oklahoma Youth Tobacco Survey of 2002. The data is collected by self-administered questionnaire administered to high school students. We grouped exposure into two categories by merging original responses obtained from the survey. We used Multivariate Logistic Regression models to determine any association between exposure to pro-smoking messages seen in media and adolescents'smoking status after controlling for age, sex, gender and extent of parental discussion.

RESULTS

Adolescents who lived with someone who smokes and whose parents did not discuss the adverse effects of smoking were almost twice as likely to smoke (OR= 2.03, 95% CI 1.4, 3.0) under the influence of smoking seen on TV or in movies, as those not exposed (p = 0.0004). The odds of smoking among adolescents who are exposed "most of the time" while living with someone who smokes and parents who often discuss the dangers of smoking are 1.75 (CI = 0.81, 3.76) times higher compared to those who are never exposed. However the results are not significant (p = 0.16). Similarly, the odds of adolescents smoking are much less (OR = 1.48, 95% CI 1, 2.2) if they are exposed to lower levels of pro-smoking messages and live with someone who smokes even if parents don't discuss the harmful effects of smoking. Adolescents are more likely to smoke depending on the number of close friends who smoke.

CONCLUSION

Our results show that parents can play an important role in protecting adolescents from the effects of pro-smoking messages in the media. Adolescents whose parents discuss the dangers of smoking are less likely to smoke even if they live with a smoker and are exposed to media smoking most of the time.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, 801 NE 13th Street, CHB 100, P.O. Box 26901, OKC, OK 73126-0901, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19548393

Citation

Butt, Amir L., et al. "Parental Influence and Effects of Pro-smoking Media Messages On Adolescents in Oklahoma." The Journal of the Oklahoma State Medical Association, vol. 102, no. 5, 2009, pp. 147-51.
Butt AL, Anderson HA, Gates DJ. Parental influence and effects of pro-smoking media messages on adolescents in Oklahoma. J Okla State Med Assoc. 2009;102(5):147-51.
Butt, A. L., Anderson, H. A., & Gates, D. J. (2009). Parental influence and effects of pro-smoking media messages on adolescents in Oklahoma. The Journal of the Oklahoma State Medical Association, 102(5), 147-51.
Butt AL, Anderson HA, Gates DJ. Parental Influence and Effects of Pro-smoking Media Messages On Adolescents in Oklahoma. J Okla State Med Assoc. 2009;102(5):147-51. PubMed PMID: 19548393.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Parental influence and effects of pro-smoking media messages on adolescents in Oklahoma. AU - Butt,Amir L, AU - Anderson,Holly A, AU - Gates,Debra J, PY - 2009/6/25/entrez PY - 2009/6/25/pubmed PY - 2009/8/12/medline SP - 147 EP - 51 JF - The Journal of the Oklahoma State Medical Association JO - J Okla State Med Assoc VL - 102 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVES: This study analyzes the important and influential role that parents can play in modifying adolescents' smoking behavior after being exposed to pro-smoking messages seen in the media. METHODS: We used data from the Oklahoma Youth Tobacco Survey of 2002. The data is collected by self-administered questionnaire administered to high school students. We grouped exposure into two categories by merging original responses obtained from the survey. We used Multivariate Logistic Regression models to determine any association between exposure to pro-smoking messages seen in media and adolescents'smoking status after controlling for age, sex, gender and extent of parental discussion. RESULTS: Adolescents who lived with someone who smokes and whose parents did not discuss the adverse effects of smoking were almost twice as likely to smoke (OR= 2.03, 95% CI 1.4, 3.0) under the influence of smoking seen on TV or in movies, as those not exposed (p = 0.0004). The odds of smoking among adolescents who are exposed "most of the time" while living with someone who smokes and parents who often discuss the dangers of smoking are 1.75 (CI = 0.81, 3.76) times higher compared to those who are never exposed. However the results are not significant (p = 0.16). Similarly, the odds of adolescents smoking are much less (OR = 1.48, 95% CI 1, 2.2) if they are exposed to lower levels of pro-smoking messages and live with someone who smokes even if parents don't discuss the harmful effects of smoking. Adolescents are more likely to smoke depending on the number of close friends who smoke. CONCLUSION: Our results show that parents can play an important role in protecting adolescents from the effects of pro-smoking messages in the media. Adolescents whose parents discuss the dangers of smoking are less likely to smoke even if they live with a smoker and are exposed to media smoking most of the time. SN - 0030-1876 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19548393/Parental_influence_and_effects_of_pro_smoking_media_messages_on_adolescents_in_Oklahoma_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -