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The reliability of a food frequency questionnaire for use among adolescents.
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2009 Oct; 63(10):1251-9.EJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Accurate measurement of dietary intake is essential for understanding the long-term effects of adolescent diet on chronic disease risk. However, adolescents may have limited food knowledge and ability to quantify portion sizes and recall dietary intake. Therefore, food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) deemed appropriate for use among adults may not be suitable for adolescents.

OBJECTIVES

To evaluate an FFQ in comparison with a 3-day food record (FR) in 14-year olds participating in a population-based cohort study in Western Australia.

METHODS

Nutrient intakes estimated by a semi-quantitative FFQ were compared with those from a 3-day FR using Bland & Altman limits of agreement (LOA), tertile classifications and Pearson's correlation coefficients.

RESULTS

A total of 785 adolescents provided data from both dietary methods. Mean agreement between the FR and FFQ ranged from 73 (starch) to 161% (vitamin C). The LOA ranged from 27 (retinol) to 976% (carotene), with most nutrients being overestimated by the FFQ. For most nutrients, agreement between the two methods varied significantly with the magnitude of intake. Pearson's r ranged from 0.11 (polyunsaturated fats) to 0.52 (riboflavin). The FFQ classified 80 to 90% of subjects' nutrient intakes into the same or adjacent tertile as their FR. Boys performed slightly better for all of these indices.

CONCLUSIONS

Agreement between individual FFQ and FR nutrient intakes was less than ideal. However, the FFQ was able to correctly rank a reasonable proportion of adolescents.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Telethon Institute for Child Health Research, Centre for Developmental Health, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Validation Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19550427

Citation

Ambrosini, G L., et al. "The Reliability of a Food Frequency Questionnaire for Use Among Adolescents." European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 63, no. 10, 2009, pp. 1251-9.
Ambrosini GL, de Klerk NH, O'Sullivan TA, et al. The reliability of a food frequency questionnaire for use among adolescents. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2009;63(10):1251-9.
Ambrosini, G. L., de Klerk, N. H., O'Sullivan, T. A., Beilin, L. J., & Oddy, W. H. (2009). The reliability of a food frequency questionnaire for use among adolescents. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 63(10), 1251-9. https://doi.org/10.1038/ejcn.2009.44
Ambrosini GL, et al. The Reliability of a Food Frequency Questionnaire for Use Among Adolescents. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2009;63(10):1251-9. PubMed PMID: 19550427.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The reliability of a food frequency questionnaire for use among adolescents. AU - Ambrosini,G L, AU - de Klerk,N H, AU - O'Sullivan,T A, AU - Beilin,L J, AU - Oddy,W H, Y1 - 2009/06/24/ PY - 2009/6/25/entrez PY - 2009/6/25/pubmed PY - 2010/1/5/medline SP - 1251 EP - 9 JF - European journal of clinical nutrition JO - Eur J Clin Nutr VL - 63 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: Accurate measurement of dietary intake is essential for understanding the long-term effects of adolescent diet on chronic disease risk. However, adolescents may have limited food knowledge and ability to quantify portion sizes and recall dietary intake. Therefore, food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) deemed appropriate for use among adults may not be suitable for adolescents. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate an FFQ in comparison with a 3-day food record (FR) in 14-year olds participating in a population-based cohort study in Western Australia. METHODS: Nutrient intakes estimated by a semi-quantitative FFQ were compared with those from a 3-day FR using Bland & Altman limits of agreement (LOA), tertile classifications and Pearson's correlation coefficients. RESULTS: A total of 785 adolescents provided data from both dietary methods. Mean agreement between the FR and FFQ ranged from 73 (starch) to 161% (vitamin C). The LOA ranged from 27 (retinol) to 976% (carotene), with most nutrients being overestimated by the FFQ. For most nutrients, agreement between the two methods varied significantly with the magnitude of intake. Pearson's r ranged from 0.11 (polyunsaturated fats) to 0.52 (riboflavin). The FFQ classified 80 to 90% of subjects' nutrient intakes into the same or adjacent tertile as their FR. Boys performed slightly better for all of these indices. CONCLUSIONS: Agreement between individual FFQ and FR nutrient intakes was less than ideal. However, the FFQ was able to correctly rank a reasonable proportion of adolescents. SN - 1476-5640 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19550427/The_reliability_of_a_food_frequency_questionnaire_for_use_among_adolescents_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/ejcn.2009.44 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -