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Correlation of rhinovirus load in the respiratory tract and clinical symptoms in hospitalized immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients.
J Med Virol. 2009 Aug; 81(8):1498-507.JM

Abstract

While human rhinoviruses (HRVs) are well accepted as a major cause of common cold syndromes (rhinitis), their role in the etiology of lower respiratory tract infections is still controversial, and their detection in asymptomatic patients is relatively common. The HRV pathogenic role in four groups of hospitalized patients (pediatric immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients, and adult immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients) was investigated by quantifying HRV load in nasopharyngeal aspirates or bronchoalveolar lavage samples by real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). Real-time RT-PCR was performed in duplicate on all respiratory samples resulting positive by qualitative RT-PCR. In addition, molecular typing allowed detection of all known HRV species (A, B, and C). In immunocompetent pediatric patients HRVs were mostly associated with lower respiratory tract infections (in the absence of other viral agents) and wheezing, when viral load was > or =10(6) RNA copies/ml. In young immunocompromised patients (stem cell transplantation recipients), an inverse correlation between HRV persistence over time and time at which the infection occurred after transplantation was observed, whereas in adult immunocompromised patients (lung transplant recipients) HRVs could be detected at a medium-low level (<10(5) RNA copies/ml) in bronchoalveolar lavage samples taken routinely from asymptomatic patients. In conclusion, when detected at high viral load, HRVs may cause severe upper and lower respiratory tract infections, whereas when detected at a medium-low viral load, an event more frequent in immunocompromised subjects, they may represent only bystander viruses.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Servizio di Virologia, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy. g.gerna@smatteo.pv.itNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19551831

Citation

Gerna, G, et al. "Correlation of Rhinovirus Load in the Respiratory Tract and Clinical Symptoms in Hospitalized Immunocompetent and Immunocompromised Patients." Journal of Medical Virology, vol. 81, no. 8, 2009, pp. 1498-507.
Gerna G, Piralla A, Rovida F, et al. Correlation of rhinovirus load in the respiratory tract and clinical symptoms in hospitalized immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients. J Med Virol. 2009;81(8):1498-507.
Gerna, G., Piralla, A., Rovida, F., Rognoni, V., Marchi, A., Locatelli, F., & Meloni, F. (2009). Correlation of rhinovirus load in the respiratory tract and clinical symptoms in hospitalized immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients. Journal of Medical Virology, 81(8), 1498-507. https://doi.org/10.1002/jmv.21548
Gerna G, et al. Correlation of Rhinovirus Load in the Respiratory Tract and Clinical Symptoms in Hospitalized Immunocompetent and Immunocompromised Patients. J Med Virol. 2009;81(8):1498-507. PubMed PMID: 19551831.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Correlation of rhinovirus load in the respiratory tract and clinical symptoms in hospitalized immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients. AU - Gerna,G, AU - Piralla,A, AU - Rovida,F, AU - Rognoni,V, AU - Marchi,A, AU - Locatelli,F, AU - Meloni,F, PY - 2009/6/25/entrez PY - 2009/6/25/pubmed PY - 2009/8/12/medline SP - 1498 EP - 507 JF - Journal of medical virology JO - J Med Virol VL - 81 IS - 8 N2 - While human rhinoviruses (HRVs) are well accepted as a major cause of common cold syndromes (rhinitis), their role in the etiology of lower respiratory tract infections is still controversial, and their detection in asymptomatic patients is relatively common. The HRV pathogenic role in four groups of hospitalized patients (pediatric immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients, and adult immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients) was investigated by quantifying HRV load in nasopharyngeal aspirates or bronchoalveolar lavage samples by real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). Real-time RT-PCR was performed in duplicate on all respiratory samples resulting positive by qualitative RT-PCR. In addition, molecular typing allowed detection of all known HRV species (A, B, and C). In immunocompetent pediatric patients HRVs were mostly associated with lower respiratory tract infections (in the absence of other viral agents) and wheezing, when viral load was > or =10(6) RNA copies/ml. In young immunocompromised patients (stem cell transplantation recipients), an inverse correlation between HRV persistence over time and time at which the infection occurred after transplantation was observed, whereas in adult immunocompromised patients (lung transplant recipients) HRVs could be detected at a medium-low level (<10(5) RNA copies/ml) in bronchoalveolar lavage samples taken routinely from asymptomatic patients. In conclusion, when detected at high viral load, HRVs may cause severe upper and lower respiratory tract infections, whereas when detected at a medium-low viral load, an event more frequent in immunocompromised subjects, they may represent only bystander viruses. SN - 1096-9071 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19551831/Correlation_of_rhinovirus_load_in_the_respiratory_tract_and_clinical_symptoms_in_hospitalized_immunocompetent_and_immunocompromised_patients_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/jmv.21548 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -