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Development of microelectrode arrays for artificial retinal implants using liquid crystal polymers.
Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2009; 50(12):5859-66IO

Abstract

PURPOSE

To develop a liquid crystal polymer (LCP)-based, long-term implantable, retinal stimulation microelectrode array using a novel fabrication method.

METHODS

The fabrication process used laser micromachining and customized thermal-press bonding to produce LCP-based microelectrode arrays. To evaluate the fabrication process and the resultant electrode arrays, in vitro reliability tests and in vivo animal experiments were performed. The in vitro tests consisted of electrode site impedance recording and electrode interlayer adhesion monitoring during accelerated soak tests. For in vivo testing, the fabricated electrode arrays were implanted in the suprachoroidal space of rabbit eyes. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and electrically evoked cortical potentials (EECPs) were used to determine long-term biocompatibility and functionality of the implant.

RESULTS

The fabricated structure had a smooth, rounded edge profile and exhibited moderate flexibility, which are advantageous features for safe implantation without guide tools. After accelerated soak tests at 75 degrees C in phosphate-buffered saline, the electrode sites showed no degradation, and the interlayer adhesion of the structure showed acceptable stability for more than 2 months. The electrode arrays were safely implanted in the suprachoroidal space of rabbit eyes, and EECP waveforms were recorded. Over a 3-month postoperative period, no chorioretinal inflammation or structural deformities were observed by OCT and histologic examination.

CONCLUSIONS

LCP-based flexible microelectrode arrays can be successfully applied as retinal prostheses. The results demonstrate that such electrode arrays are safe, biocompatible, and mechanically stable and that they can be effective as part of a chronic retinal implant system.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Gwanak-gu, Korea.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19553608

Citation

Lee, Seung Woo, et al. "Development of Microelectrode Arrays for Artificial Retinal Implants Using Liquid Crystal Polymers." Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, vol. 50, no. 12, 2009, pp. 5859-66.
Lee SW, Seo JM, Ha S, et al. Development of microelectrode arrays for artificial retinal implants using liquid crystal polymers. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2009;50(12):5859-66.
Lee, S. W., Seo, J. M., Ha, S., Kim, E. T., Chung, H., & Kim, S. J. (2009). Development of microelectrode arrays for artificial retinal implants using liquid crystal polymers. Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, 50(12), pp. 5859-66. doi:10.1167/iovs.09-3743.
Lee SW, et al. Development of Microelectrode Arrays for Artificial Retinal Implants Using Liquid Crystal Polymers. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2009;50(12):5859-66. PubMed PMID: 19553608.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Development of microelectrode arrays for artificial retinal implants using liquid crystal polymers. AU - Lee,Seung Woo, AU - Seo,Jong-Mo, AU - Ha,Seungmin, AU - Kim,Eui Tae, AU - Chung,Hum, AU - Kim,Sung June, Y1 - 2009/06/24/ PY - 2009/6/26/entrez PY - 2009/6/26/pubmed PY - 2009/12/24/medline SP - 5859 EP - 66 JF - Investigative ophthalmology & visual science JO - Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. VL - 50 IS - 12 N2 - PURPOSE: To develop a liquid crystal polymer (LCP)-based, long-term implantable, retinal stimulation microelectrode array using a novel fabrication method. METHODS: The fabrication process used laser micromachining and customized thermal-press bonding to produce LCP-based microelectrode arrays. To evaluate the fabrication process and the resultant electrode arrays, in vitro reliability tests and in vivo animal experiments were performed. The in vitro tests consisted of electrode site impedance recording and electrode interlayer adhesion monitoring during accelerated soak tests. For in vivo testing, the fabricated electrode arrays were implanted in the suprachoroidal space of rabbit eyes. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and electrically evoked cortical potentials (EECPs) were used to determine long-term biocompatibility and functionality of the implant. RESULTS: The fabricated structure had a smooth, rounded edge profile and exhibited moderate flexibility, which are advantageous features for safe implantation without guide tools. After accelerated soak tests at 75 degrees C in phosphate-buffered saline, the electrode sites showed no degradation, and the interlayer adhesion of the structure showed acceptable stability for more than 2 months. The electrode arrays were safely implanted in the suprachoroidal space of rabbit eyes, and EECP waveforms were recorded. Over a 3-month postoperative period, no chorioretinal inflammation or structural deformities were observed by OCT and histologic examination. CONCLUSIONS: LCP-based flexible microelectrode arrays can be successfully applied as retinal prostheses. The results demonstrate that such electrode arrays are safe, biocompatible, and mechanically stable and that they can be effective as part of a chronic retinal implant system. SN - 1552-5783 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19553608/Development_of_microelectrode_arrays_for_artificial_retinal_implants_using_liquid_crystal_polymers_ L2 - http://iovs.arvojournals.org/article.aspx?doi=10.1167/iovs.09-3743 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -