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Smoking attenuates the negative association between carotenoids consumption and colorectal cancer risk.
Cancer Causes Control 2009; 20(8):1327-38CC

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Consumption of vegetables and fruits, physical activity, obesity and caloric intake are all strongly related to the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). The association between dietary intake of carotenoids from vegetables/fruits and risk of CRC in the context of cigarette smoking was studied in a nutritionally diverse population.

METHODS

The study included 1,817 age sex residence-matched case-control pairs from a population-based study in Northern Israel. Data were acquired by food-frequency questionnaire. Individual intake of carotenoid isomers was calculated using an Israeli food content database. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated using conditional logistic regression models adjusted for known risk factors.

RESULTS

Strong inverse associations were found with consumption of 9-cis-beta-carotene (OR = 0.35, 0.26-0.47), all-trans-beta-carotene (OR = 0.58, 0.44-0.76), cis-beta-cryptoxanthin (OR = 0.67, 0.50-0.90), all-trans-zeaxanthin (OR = 0.64, 0.48-0.86), and lutein (OR = 0.74, 0.57-0.96). Lycopene (OR = 2.22, 1.71-2.89) and all-trans-beta-cryptoxanthin (OR = 2.01, 1.48-2.73) were associated with increased risk of CRC. Inverse associations of most carotenoids with CRC, demonstrated in non-smokers, were much attenuated or reversed in past or current smokers with a highly significant interaction term.

CONCLUSIONS

Consumption of most dietary carotenoids was found to be strongly associated with reduced risk of CRC. However, smoking significantly attenuated or reversed this observed protective effect on CRC occurrence. Smokers should be advised that smoking also hampers the potential health promoting effects of high fruit and vegetable consumption.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Community Medicine and Epidemiology, CHS National Cancer Control Center, Carmel Medical Center and B. Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, 7 Michal St, 34362, Haifa, Israel.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19562494

Citation

Chaiter, Y, et al. "Smoking Attenuates the Negative Association Between Carotenoids Consumption and Colorectal Cancer Risk." Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, vol. 20, no. 8, 2009, pp. 1327-38.
Chaiter Y, Gruber SB, Ben-Amotz A, et al. Smoking attenuates the negative association between carotenoids consumption and colorectal cancer risk. Cancer Causes Control. 2009;20(8):1327-38.
Chaiter, Y., Gruber, S. B., Ben-Amotz, A., Almog, R., Rennert, H. S., Fischler, R., ... Rennert, G. (2009). Smoking attenuates the negative association between carotenoids consumption and colorectal cancer risk. Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, 20(8), pp. 1327-38. doi:10.1007/s10552-009-9354-7.
Chaiter Y, et al. Smoking Attenuates the Negative Association Between Carotenoids Consumption and Colorectal Cancer Risk. Cancer Causes Control. 2009;20(8):1327-38. PubMed PMID: 19562494.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Smoking attenuates the negative association between carotenoids consumption and colorectal cancer risk. AU - Chaiter,Y, AU - Gruber,S B, AU - Ben-Amotz,A, AU - Almog,R, AU - Rennert,H S, AU - Fischler,R, AU - Rozen,G, AU - Rennert,G, Y1 - 2009/06/27/ PY - 2008/07/02/received PY - 2009/04/20/accepted PY - 2009/6/30/entrez PY - 2009/6/30/pubmed PY - 2010/6/18/medline SP - 1327 EP - 38 JF - Cancer causes & control : CCC JO - Cancer Causes Control VL - 20 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Consumption of vegetables and fruits, physical activity, obesity and caloric intake are all strongly related to the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). The association between dietary intake of carotenoids from vegetables/fruits and risk of CRC in the context of cigarette smoking was studied in a nutritionally diverse population. METHODS: The study included 1,817 age sex residence-matched case-control pairs from a population-based study in Northern Israel. Data were acquired by food-frequency questionnaire. Individual intake of carotenoid isomers was calculated using an Israeli food content database. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated using conditional logistic regression models adjusted for known risk factors. RESULTS: Strong inverse associations were found with consumption of 9-cis-beta-carotene (OR = 0.35, 0.26-0.47), all-trans-beta-carotene (OR = 0.58, 0.44-0.76), cis-beta-cryptoxanthin (OR = 0.67, 0.50-0.90), all-trans-zeaxanthin (OR = 0.64, 0.48-0.86), and lutein (OR = 0.74, 0.57-0.96). Lycopene (OR = 2.22, 1.71-2.89) and all-trans-beta-cryptoxanthin (OR = 2.01, 1.48-2.73) were associated with increased risk of CRC. Inverse associations of most carotenoids with CRC, demonstrated in non-smokers, were much attenuated or reversed in past or current smokers with a highly significant interaction term. CONCLUSIONS: Consumption of most dietary carotenoids was found to be strongly associated with reduced risk of CRC. However, smoking significantly attenuated or reversed this observed protective effect on CRC occurrence. Smokers should be advised that smoking also hampers the potential health promoting effects of high fruit and vegetable consumption. SN - 1573-7225 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19562494/Smoking_attenuates_the_negative_association_between_carotenoids_consumption_and_colorectal_cancer_risk_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-009-9354-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -