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The physical and mental health of Australian Vietnam veterans 3 decades after the war and its relation to military service, combat, and post-traumatic stress disorder.
Am J Epidemiol 2009; 170(3):318-30AJ

Abstract

The long-term health consequences of war service remain unclear, despite burgeoning scientific interest. A longitudinal cohort study of a random sample of Australian Vietnam veterans was designed to assess veterans' postwar physical and mental health 36 years after the war (2005-2006) and to examine its relation to Army service, combat, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) assessed 14 years previously (1990-1993). Prevalences in veterans (n = 450) were compared with those in the Australian general population. Veterans' Army service and data from the first assessments were evaluated using multivariate logistic regression prediction modeling. Veterans' general health and some health risk factors were poorer and medical consultation rates were higher than Australian population expectations. Of 67 long-term conditions, the prevalences of 47 were higher and the prevalences of 4 were lower when compared with population expectations. Half of all veterans took some form of medication for mental well-being. The prevalence of psychiatric diagnoses exceeded Australian population expectations. Military and war service characteristics and age were the most frequent predictors of physical health endpoints, while PTSD was most strongly associated with psychiatric diagnoses. Draftees had better physical health than regular enlistees but no better mental health. Army service and war-related PTSD are associated with risk of illness in later life among Australian Vietnam veterans.

Authors+Show Affiliations

ANZAC Research Institute, Repatriation General Hospital Concord, New South Wales, Australia. botoole@med.usyd.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19564170

Citation

O'Toole, Brian I., et al. "The Physical and Mental Health of Australian Vietnam Veterans 3 Decades After the War and Its Relation to Military Service, Combat, and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder." American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 170, no. 3, 2009, pp. 318-30.
O'Toole BI, Catts SV, Outram S, et al. The physical and mental health of Australian Vietnam veterans 3 decades after the war and its relation to military service, combat, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Am J Epidemiol. 2009;170(3):318-30.
O'Toole, B. I., Catts, S. V., Outram, S., Pierse, K. R., & Cockburn, J. (2009). The physical and mental health of Australian Vietnam veterans 3 decades after the war and its relation to military service, combat, and post-traumatic stress disorder. American Journal of Epidemiology, 170(3), pp. 318-30. doi:10.1093/aje/kwp146.
O'Toole BI, et al. The Physical and Mental Health of Australian Vietnam Veterans 3 Decades After the War and Its Relation to Military Service, Combat, and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder. Am J Epidemiol. 2009 Aug 1;170(3):318-30. PubMed PMID: 19564170.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The physical and mental health of Australian Vietnam veterans 3 decades after the war and its relation to military service, combat, and post-traumatic stress disorder. AU - O'Toole,Brian I, AU - Catts,Stanley V, AU - Outram,Sue, AU - Pierse,Katherine R, AU - Cockburn,Jill, Y1 - 2009/06/29/ PY - 2009/7/1/entrez PY - 2009/7/1/pubmed PY - 2009/8/14/medline SP - 318 EP - 30 JF - American journal of epidemiology JO - Am. J. Epidemiol. VL - 170 IS - 3 N2 - The long-term health consequences of war service remain unclear, despite burgeoning scientific interest. A longitudinal cohort study of a random sample of Australian Vietnam veterans was designed to assess veterans' postwar physical and mental health 36 years after the war (2005-2006) and to examine its relation to Army service, combat, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) assessed 14 years previously (1990-1993). Prevalences in veterans (n = 450) were compared with those in the Australian general population. Veterans' Army service and data from the first assessments were evaluated using multivariate logistic regression prediction modeling. Veterans' general health and some health risk factors were poorer and medical consultation rates were higher than Australian population expectations. Of 67 long-term conditions, the prevalences of 47 were higher and the prevalences of 4 were lower when compared with population expectations. Half of all veterans took some form of medication for mental well-being. The prevalence of psychiatric diagnoses exceeded Australian population expectations. Military and war service characteristics and age were the most frequent predictors of physical health endpoints, while PTSD was most strongly associated with psychiatric diagnoses. Draftees had better physical health than regular enlistees but no better mental health. Army service and war-related PTSD are associated with risk of illness in later life among Australian Vietnam veterans. SN - 1476-6256 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19564170/The_physical_and_mental_health_of_Australian_Vietnam_veterans_3_decades_after_the_war_and_its_relation_to_military_service_combat_and_post_traumatic_stress_disorder_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/aje/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/aje/kwp146 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -