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Ganglioneuroblastoma-associated vitamin D deficiency rickets.
J Pediatr Hematol Oncol 2009; 31(7):502-4JP

Abstract

Vitamin D deficiency is the most common cause of rickets mainly in breast-fed dark-skinned, African or Asian children receiving inadequate sunlight exposure. We report a case of a 1.5 year-old Afro-Italian male infant living in South Italy who came to our observation with the typical clinical picture of vitamin D deficiency rickets. The child was exclusively breast-fed for 8 months without vitamin D supplements. Owing to the rarity of vitamin D deficiency rickets in the South of Italy he underwent several investigations, which demonstrated the association with an abdominal ganglioneuroblastoma. To our knowledge, ganglioneuroblastoma has never been reported in association with vitamin D deficiency rickets. Although the association between these 2 rare conditions may be coincidental, the protective action of vitamin D against cancer suggests that vitamin D deficiency might have contributed to the development of ganglioneuroblastoma in our patient.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, University of Catania, Catania daggerDepartment of Pediatrics, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19564745

Citation

La Rosa, Clementina, et al. "Ganglioneuroblastoma-associated Vitamin D Deficiency Rickets." Journal of Pediatric Hematology/oncology, vol. 31, no. 7, 2009, pp. 502-4.
La Rosa C, Baroncelli GI, Pavone P, et al. Ganglioneuroblastoma-associated vitamin D deficiency rickets. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 2009;31(7):502-4.
La Rosa, C., Baroncelli, G. I., Pavone, P., Praticò, A. D., Di Cataldo, A., & Caruso-Nicoletti, M. (2009). Ganglioneuroblastoma-associated vitamin D deficiency rickets. Journal of Pediatric Hematology/oncology, 31(7), pp. 502-4. doi:10.1097/MPH.0b013e3181983c5c.
La Rosa C, et al. Ganglioneuroblastoma-associated Vitamin D Deficiency Rickets. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 2009;31(7):502-4. PubMed PMID: 19564745.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ganglioneuroblastoma-associated vitamin D deficiency rickets. AU - La Rosa,Clementina, AU - Baroncelli,Gianpiero Igli, AU - Pavone,Piero, AU - Praticò,Andrea Domenico, AU - Di Cataldo,Andrea, AU - Caruso-Nicoletti,Manuela, PY - 2009/7/1/entrez PY - 2009/7/1/pubmed PY - 2009/7/16/medline SP - 502 EP - 4 JF - Journal of pediatric hematology/oncology JO - J. Pediatr. Hematol. Oncol. VL - 31 IS - 7 N2 - Vitamin D deficiency is the most common cause of rickets mainly in breast-fed dark-skinned, African or Asian children receiving inadequate sunlight exposure. We report a case of a 1.5 year-old Afro-Italian male infant living in South Italy who came to our observation with the typical clinical picture of vitamin D deficiency rickets. The child was exclusively breast-fed for 8 months without vitamin D supplements. Owing to the rarity of vitamin D deficiency rickets in the South of Italy he underwent several investigations, which demonstrated the association with an abdominal ganglioneuroblastoma. To our knowledge, ganglioneuroblastoma has never been reported in association with vitamin D deficiency rickets. Although the association between these 2 rare conditions may be coincidental, the protective action of vitamin D against cancer suggests that vitamin D deficiency might have contributed to the development of ganglioneuroblastoma in our patient. SN - 1536-3678 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19564745/Ganglioneuroblastoma_associated_vitamin_D_deficiency_rickets_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=19564745 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -