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High intestinal IgA associates with reduced risk of IgE-associated allergic diseases.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2010; 21(1 Pt 1):67-73PA

Abstract

Development of oral tolerance and its stimulation by probiotics are still incomprehensible. Microbial stimulation of the gut may induce a subtle inflammation and induce secretion of mucosal IgA, which participates in antigen elimination. In a cohort of allergy-prone infants receiving probiotics and prebiotics or placebo we studied intestinal IgA and inflammation in the development of eczema, food allergy, asthma, and rhinitis (allergic diseases). We performed a nested unmatched case-control study of 237 infants participating in a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled allergy-prevention trial using a combination of four probiotic strains pre-natally and during 6 months form birth. We measured faecal IgA, alpha1-antitrypsin (alpha1-AT), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and calprotectin at the age of 3 and 6 months. By age 2 yr, 124 infants had developed allergic disease or IgE-sensitization (cases) and 113 had not (controls). In infants with high faecal IgA concentration at the age of 6 months, the risk of having any allergic disease before the age of 2 yr tended to reduce [odds ratio (OR: 0.52)] and the risk for any IgE-associated (atopic) disease reduced significantly (OR: 0.49). High faecal calprotectin at the age of 6 months associated also with lower risk for IgE-associated diseases up to age 2 yr (OR: 0.49). All faecal inflammation markers (alpha1-AT, TNF-alpha, and calprotectin) correlated positively with faecal IgA (p < 0.001). Probiotics tended to augment faecal IgA (p = 0.085) and significantly increased faecal alpha1-AT (p = 0.001). High intestinal IgA in early life associates with minimal intestinal inflammation and indicates reduced risk for IgE-associated allergic diseases.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Skin and Allergy Hospital, Department of Pediatric Allergology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. kaarina.kukkonen@hus.fi

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19566584

Citation

Kukkonen, Kaarina, et al. "High Intestinal IgA Associates With Reduced Risk of IgE-associated Allergic Diseases." Pediatric Allergy and Immunology : Official Publication of the European Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, vol. 21, no. 1 Pt 1, 2010, pp. 67-73.
Kukkonen K, Kuitunen M, Haahtela T, et al. High intestinal IgA associates with reduced risk of IgE-associated allergic diseases. Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2010;21(1 Pt 1):67-73.
Kukkonen, K., Kuitunen, M., Haahtela, T., Korpela, R., Poussa, T., & Savilahti, E. (2010). High intestinal IgA associates with reduced risk of IgE-associated allergic diseases. Pediatric Allergy and Immunology : Official Publication of the European Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, 21(1 Pt 1), pp. 67-73. doi:10.1111/j.1399-3038.2009.00907.x.
Kukkonen K, et al. High Intestinal IgA Associates With Reduced Risk of IgE-associated Allergic Diseases. Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2010;21(1 Pt 1):67-73. PubMed PMID: 19566584.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - High intestinal IgA associates with reduced risk of IgE-associated allergic diseases. AU - Kukkonen,Kaarina, AU - Kuitunen,Mikael, AU - Haahtela,Tari, AU - Korpela,Riitta, AU - Poussa,Tuija, AU - Savilahti,Erkki, Y1 - 2009/06/26/ PY - 2009/7/2/entrez PY - 2009/7/2/pubmed PY - 2010/8/24/medline SP - 67 EP - 73 JF - Pediatric allergy and immunology : official publication of the European Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology JO - Pediatr Allergy Immunol VL - 21 IS - 1 Pt 1 N2 - Development of oral tolerance and its stimulation by probiotics are still incomprehensible. Microbial stimulation of the gut may induce a subtle inflammation and induce secretion of mucosal IgA, which participates in antigen elimination. In a cohort of allergy-prone infants receiving probiotics and prebiotics or placebo we studied intestinal IgA and inflammation in the development of eczema, food allergy, asthma, and rhinitis (allergic diseases). We performed a nested unmatched case-control study of 237 infants participating in a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled allergy-prevention trial using a combination of four probiotic strains pre-natally and during 6 months form birth. We measured faecal IgA, alpha1-antitrypsin (alpha1-AT), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and calprotectin at the age of 3 and 6 months. By age 2 yr, 124 infants had developed allergic disease or IgE-sensitization (cases) and 113 had not (controls). In infants with high faecal IgA concentration at the age of 6 months, the risk of having any allergic disease before the age of 2 yr tended to reduce [odds ratio (OR: 0.52)] and the risk for any IgE-associated (atopic) disease reduced significantly (OR: 0.49). High faecal calprotectin at the age of 6 months associated also with lower risk for IgE-associated diseases up to age 2 yr (OR: 0.49). All faecal inflammation markers (alpha1-AT, TNF-alpha, and calprotectin) correlated positively with faecal IgA (p < 0.001). Probiotics tended to augment faecal IgA (p = 0.085) and significantly increased faecal alpha1-AT (p = 0.001). High intestinal IgA in early life associates with minimal intestinal inflammation and indicates reduced risk for IgE-associated allergic diseases. SN - 1399-3038 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19566584/High_intestinal_IgA_associates_with_reduced_risk_of_IgE_associated_allergic_diseases_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1399-3038.2009.00907.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -