Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Comparison of self-reported health & healthcare utilisation between asylum seekers and refugees: an observational study.
BMC Public Health. 2009 Jun 30; 9:214.BP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Adult refugees and asylum seekers living in Western countries experience a high prevalence of mental health problems, especially post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression and anxiety. This study compares and contrasts the prevalence of health problems, and potential risk factors as well as the utilisation of health services by asylum seekers and refugees in the Irish context.

METHODS

Cross sectional study using validated self reported health status questionnaires of adult asylum seekers (n = 60) and refugees (n = 28) from 30 countries, living in Ireland. Outcome measures included: general health status (SF-36), presence of PTSD symptoms and anxiety/depression symptoms. Data on chronic conditions and pre or post migration stressors are also reported. The two groups are compared for utilisation of the health care system and the use of over the counter medications.

RESULTS

Asylum seekers were significantly more likely than refugees to report symptoms of PTSD (OR 6.3, 95% CI: 2.2-17.9) and depression/anxiety (OR 5.8, 95% CI: 2.2-15.4), while no significant difference was found in self-reported general health. When adjusted by multivariable regression, the presence of more than one chronic disease (OR 4.0, 95%CI: 1.3-12.7; OR 3.4, 95% CI: 1.2-10.1), high levels of pre migration stressors (OR 3.6, 95% CI: 1.1-11.9; OR 3.3, 95% CI: 1.0-10.4) or post migration stressors (OR 17.3, 95% CI: 4.9-60.8; OR 3.9, 95% CI: 1.2-12.3) were independent predictors of self reported PTSD or depression/anxiety symptoms respectively, however, residence status was no longer significantly associated with PTSD or depression/anxiety. Residence status may act as a marker for other explanatory variables; our results show it has a strong relationship with post migration stressors (chi2 = 19.74, df = 1, P < 0.001).In terms of health care utilisation, asylum seekers use GP services more often than refugees, while no significant difference was found between these groups for use of dentists, medication, hospitalisation or mental health services.

CONCLUSION

Asylum seekers have a higher level of self reported PTSD and depression/anxiety symptoms compared to refugees. However, residence status appears to act as a marker for post migration stressors. Compared to refugees, asylum seekers utilise GP services more often, but not mental health services.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of General Practice, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland Medical School, Dublin 2, Ireland. mtoar@hotmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19566954

Citation

Toar, Magzoub, et al. "Comparison of Self-reported Health & Healthcare Utilisation Between Asylum Seekers and Refugees: an Observational Study." BMC Public Health, vol. 9, 2009, p. 214.
Toar M, O'Brien KK, Fahey T. Comparison of self-reported health & healthcare utilisation between asylum seekers and refugees: an observational study. BMC Public Health. 2009;9:214.
Toar, M., O'Brien, K. K., & Fahey, T. (2009). Comparison of self-reported health & healthcare utilisation between asylum seekers and refugees: an observational study. BMC Public Health, 9, 214. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-9-214
Toar M, O'Brien KK, Fahey T. Comparison of Self-reported Health & Healthcare Utilisation Between Asylum Seekers and Refugees: an Observational Study. BMC Public Health. 2009 Jun 30;9:214. PubMed PMID: 19566954.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Comparison of self-reported health & healthcare utilisation between asylum seekers and refugees: an observational study. AU - Toar,Magzoub, AU - O'Brien,Kirsty K, AU - Fahey,Tom, Y1 - 2009/06/30/ PY - 2009/01/22/received PY - 2009/06/30/accepted PY - 2009/7/2/entrez PY - 2009/7/2/pubmed PY - 2009/11/11/medline SP - 214 EP - 214 JF - BMC public health JO - BMC Public Health VL - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: Adult refugees and asylum seekers living in Western countries experience a high prevalence of mental health problems, especially post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression and anxiety. This study compares and contrasts the prevalence of health problems, and potential risk factors as well as the utilisation of health services by asylum seekers and refugees in the Irish context. METHODS: Cross sectional study using validated self reported health status questionnaires of adult asylum seekers (n = 60) and refugees (n = 28) from 30 countries, living in Ireland. Outcome measures included: general health status (SF-36), presence of PTSD symptoms and anxiety/depression symptoms. Data on chronic conditions and pre or post migration stressors are also reported. The two groups are compared for utilisation of the health care system and the use of over the counter medications. RESULTS: Asylum seekers were significantly more likely than refugees to report symptoms of PTSD (OR 6.3, 95% CI: 2.2-17.9) and depression/anxiety (OR 5.8, 95% CI: 2.2-15.4), while no significant difference was found in self-reported general health. When adjusted by multivariable regression, the presence of more than one chronic disease (OR 4.0, 95%CI: 1.3-12.7; OR 3.4, 95% CI: 1.2-10.1), high levels of pre migration stressors (OR 3.6, 95% CI: 1.1-11.9; OR 3.3, 95% CI: 1.0-10.4) or post migration stressors (OR 17.3, 95% CI: 4.9-60.8; OR 3.9, 95% CI: 1.2-12.3) were independent predictors of self reported PTSD or depression/anxiety symptoms respectively, however, residence status was no longer significantly associated with PTSD or depression/anxiety. Residence status may act as a marker for other explanatory variables; our results show it has a strong relationship with post migration stressors (chi2 = 19.74, df = 1, P < 0.001).In terms of health care utilisation, asylum seekers use GP services more often than refugees, while no significant difference was found between these groups for use of dentists, medication, hospitalisation or mental health services. CONCLUSION: Asylum seekers have a higher level of self reported PTSD and depression/anxiety symptoms compared to refugees. However, residence status appears to act as a marker for post migration stressors. Compared to refugees, asylum seekers utilise GP services more often, but not mental health services. SN - 1471-2458 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19566954/Comparison_of_self_reported_health_&_healthcare_utilisation_between_asylum_seekers_and_refugees:_an_observational_study_ L2 - https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2458-9-214 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -