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Fire-related cognitions moderate the impact of risk factors on adjustment following wildfire disaster.
J Anxiety Disord. 2009 Oct; 23(7):891-6.JA

Abstract

This study builds upon current understanding of risk and protective factors for post-disaster adjustment by examining relationships between disaster-related cognitions, three empirically supported risk factors for poorer adjustment (i.e., greater disaster impact, female gender, and racial/ethnic minority status), and three common post-disaster outcomes (i.e., depression, anxiety, and somatic complaints). Participants were 200 students exposed to wildfire disaster. Simultaneous hierarchical regression analyses revealed that, during the acute stress period: (1) disaster-related cognitions in interaction with fire impact and minority status, as well as gender, were related to anxiety symptoms, (2) cognitions were related to depression symptoms, and (3) cognitions in interaction with minority status, as well as fire impact, were related to somatic symptoms. No examined variables predicted symptom change.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, California State University, Fullerton, CA 92834, USA. cscher@fullerton.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19574024

Citation

Scher, Christine D., and Joel Ellwanger. "Fire-related Cognitions Moderate the Impact of Risk Factors On Adjustment Following Wildfire Disaster." Journal of Anxiety Disorders, vol. 23, no. 7, 2009, pp. 891-6.
Scher CD, Ellwanger J. Fire-related cognitions moderate the impact of risk factors on adjustment following wildfire disaster. J Anxiety Disord. 2009;23(7):891-6.
Scher, C. D., & Ellwanger, J. (2009). Fire-related cognitions moderate the impact of risk factors on adjustment following wildfire disaster. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 23(7), 891-6. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.janxdis.2009.05.007
Scher CD, Ellwanger J. Fire-related Cognitions Moderate the Impact of Risk Factors On Adjustment Following Wildfire Disaster. J Anxiety Disord. 2009;23(7):891-6. PubMed PMID: 19574024.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fire-related cognitions moderate the impact of risk factors on adjustment following wildfire disaster. AU - Scher,Christine D, AU - Ellwanger,Joel, Y1 - 2009/06/09/ PY - 2009/03/11/received PY - 2009/04/28/revised PY - 2009/05/28/accepted PY - 2009/7/4/entrez PY - 2009/7/4/pubmed PY - 2009/11/3/medline SP - 891 EP - 6 JF - Journal of anxiety disorders JO - J Anxiety Disord VL - 23 IS - 7 N2 - This study builds upon current understanding of risk and protective factors for post-disaster adjustment by examining relationships between disaster-related cognitions, three empirically supported risk factors for poorer adjustment (i.e., greater disaster impact, female gender, and racial/ethnic minority status), and three common post-disaster outcomes (i.e., depression, anxiety, and somatic complaints). Participants were 200 students exposed to wildfire disaster. Simultaneous hierarchical regression analyses revealed that, during the acute stress period: (1) disaster-related cognitions in interaction with fire impact and minority status, as well as gender, were related to anxiety symptoms, (2) cognitions were related to depression symptoms, and (3) cognitions in interaction with minority status, as well as fire impact, were related to somatic symptoms. No examined variables predicted symptom change. SN - 1873-7897 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19574024/Fire_related_cognitions_moderate_the_impact_of_risk_factors_on_adjustment_following_wildfire_disaster_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0887-6185(09)00116-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -