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Dairy intake and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels in men at high risk for prostate cancer.
Cancer Causes Control 2009; 20(10):1947-54CC

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Dairy food intake has been associated with prostate cancer in previous work, but the mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. Dairy calcium may suppress circulating levels of potentially cancer-protective 1,25-hydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D). We examined the associations of dairy, milk, calcium, and vitamin D intake with plasma 1,25(OH)2D levels among 296 men (194 black, 102 non-black) enrolled in a high risk program for prostate cancer from 10/96 to 10/07.

METHODS

All participants completed diet and health history questionnaires and provided plasma samples, which were assessed for levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25(OH)2D. We used multivariate linear regression to examine associations with 1,25(OH)2D.

RESULTS

After adjustment for age, race, energy intake, BMI, and alcohol intake, we observed no associations for any of our variables of interest with 1,25(OH)2D, or any meaningful differences in estimates by race or vitamin D status.

CONCLUSION

Our findings, in a sample including a large proportion of black participants, do not confirm previous findings showing an inverse association between calcium intake and 1,25(OH)2D levels. As such, they suggest that future work should explore other mechanisms by which dairy foods and calcium might increase prostate cancer risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Kinesiology, California Polytechnic State University, 1 Grand Avenue, San Luis Obispo, CA 93407, USA. mtseng@calpoly.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19578936

Citation

Tseng, Marilyn, et al. "Dairy Intake and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D Levels in Men at High Risk for Prostate Cancer." Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, vol. 20, no. 10, 2009, pp. 1947-54.
Tseng M, Giri V, Watkins-Bruner D, et al. Dairy intake and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels in men at high risk for prostate cancer. Cancer Causes Control. 2009;20(10):1947-54.
Tseng, M., Giri, V., Watkins-Bruner, D., & Giovannucci, E. (2009). Dairy intake and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels in men at high risk for prostate cancer. Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, 20(10), pp. 1947-54. doi:10.1007/s10552-009-9389-9.
Tseng M, et al. Dairy Intake and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D Levels in Men at High Risk for Prostate Cancer. Cancer Causes Control. 2009;20(10):1947-54. PubMed PMID: 19578936.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dairy intake and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels in men at high risk for prostate cancer. AU - Tseng,Marilyn, AU - Giri,Veda, AU - Watkins-Bruner,Deborah, AU - Giovannucci,Edward, PY - 2008/10/16/received PY - 2009/06/18/accepted PY - 2009/7/7/entrez PY - 2009/7/7/pubmed PY - 2011/6/22/medline SP - 1947 EP - 54 JF - Cancer causes & control : CCC JO - Cancer Causes Control VL - 20 IS - 10 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Dairy food intake has been associated with prostate cancer in previous work, but the mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. Dairy calcium may suppress circulating levels of potentially cancer-protective 1,25-hydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D). We examined the associations of dairy, milk, calcium, and vitamin D intake with plasma 1,25(OH)2D levels among 296 men (194 black, 102 non-black) enrolled in a high risk program for prostate cancer from 10/96 to 10/07. METHODS: All participants completed diet and health history questionnaires and provided plasma samples, which were assessed for levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25(OH)2D. We used multivariate linear regression to examine associations with 1,25(OH)2D. RESULTS: After adjustment for age, race, energy intake, BMI, and alcohol intake, we observed no associations for any of our variables of interest with 1,25(OH)2D, or any meaningful differences in estimates by race or vitamin D status. CONCLUSION: Our findings, in a sample including a large proportion of black participants, do not confirm previous findings showing an inverse association between calcium intake and 1,25(OH)2D levels. As such, they suggest that future work should explore other mechanisms by which dairy foods and calcium might increase prostate cancer risk. SN - 1573-7225 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19578936/Dairy_intake_and_125_dihydroxyvitamin_D_levels_in_men_at_high_risk_for_prostate_cancer_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-009-9389-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -