Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Breast-feeding is associated with a reduced frequency of acute otitis media and high serum antibody levels against NTHi and outer membrane protein vaccine antigen candidate P6.
Pediatr Res 2009; 66(5):565-70PR

Abstract

Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) causes acute otitis media (AOM) in infants. Breast-feeding protects against AOM and/or nasopharyngeal (NP) colonization; however, the mechanism of protection is incompletely understood. Children with AOM and healthy children were studied according to feeding status: breastfed,breast/formula fed, or formula fed. Cumulative episodes of AOM, ELISA titers of serum IgG antibodies to whole-cell NTHi and vaccine candidate outer membrane protein P6, bactericidal titers of serum and NP colonization by NTHi were assessed. A lower incidence of AOM was found in breast- versus formula-fed children. Levels of specific serum IgG antibody to NTHi and P6 were highest in breast-fed, intermediate in breast/formula fed, and lowest in formula-fed infants. Serum IgG antibody to P6 correlated with bactericidal activity against NTHi. Among children with AOM, the prevalence of NTHi in the NP was lower in breast- versus nonbreast-fed infants. We conclude that breast-feeding shows an association with higher levels of antibodies to NTHi and P6, suggesting that breast-feeding modulates the serum immune response to NTHi and P6. Higher serum IgG might facilitate protection against AOM and NP colonization in breast-fed children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Microbiology/Immunology, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19581824

Citation

Sabirov, Albert, et al. "Breast-feeding Is Associated With a Reduced Frequency of Acute Otitis Media and High Serum Antibody Levels Against NTHi and Outer Membrane Protein Vaccine Antigen Candidate P6." Pediatric Research, vol. 66, no. 5, 2009, pp. 565-70.
Sabirov A, Casey JR, Murphy TF, et al. Breast-feeding is associated with a reduced frequency of acute otitis media and high serum antibody levels against NTHi and outer membrane protein vaccine antigen candidate P6. Pediatr Res. 2009;66(5):565-70.
Sabirov, A., Casey, J. R., Murphy, T. F., & Pichichero, M. E. (2009). Breast-feeding is associated with a reduced frequency of acute otitis media and high serum antibody levels against NTHi and outer membrane protein vaccine antigen candidate P6. Pediatric Research, 66(5), pp. 565-70. doi:10.1203/PDR.0b013e3181b4f8a6.
Sabirov A, et al. Breast-feeding Is Associated With a Reduced Frequency of Acute Otitis Media and High Serum Antibody Levels Against NTHi and Outer Membrane Protein Vaccine Antigen Candidate P6. Pediatr Res. 2009;66(5):565-70. PubMed PMID: 19581824.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Breast-feeding is associated with a reduced frequency of acute otitis media and high serum antibody levels against NTHi and outer membrane protein vaccine antigen candidate P6. AU - Sabirov,Albert, AU - Casey,Janet R, AU - Murphy,Timothy F, AU - Pichichero,Michael E, PY - 2009/7/8/entrez PY - 2009/7/8/pubmed PY - 2010/1/13/medline SP - 565 EP - 70 JF - Pediatric research JO - Pediatr. Res. VL - 66 IS - 5 N2 - Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) causes acute otitis media (AOM) in infants. Breast-feeding protects against AOM and/or nasopharyngeal (NP) colonization; however, the mechanism of protection is incompletely understood. Children with AOM and healthy children were studied according to feeding status: breastfed,breast/formula fed, or formula fed. Cumulative episodes of AOM, ELISA titers of serum IgG antibodies to whole-cell NTHi and vaccine candidate outer membrane protein P6, bactericidal titers of serum and NP colonization by NTHi were assessed. A lower incidence of AOM was found in breast- versus formula-fed children. Levels of specific serum IgG antibody to NTHi and P6 were highest in breast-fed, intermediate in breast/formula fed, and lowest in formula-fed infants. Serum IgG antibody to P6 correlated with bactericidal activity against NTHi. Among children with AOM, the prevalence of NTHi in the NP was lower in breast- versus nonbreast-fed infants. We conclude that breast-feeding shows an association with higher levels of antibodies to NTHi and P6, suggesting that breast-feeding modulates the serum immune response to NTHi and P6. Higher serum IgG might facilitate protection against AOM and NP colonization in breast-fed children. SN - 1530-0447 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19581824/full_citation L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1203/PDR.0b013e3181b4f8a6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -