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Representations of the caregiver-child relationship and of the self, and emotion regulation in the narratives of young children whose mothers have borderline personality disorder.
Dev Psychopathol. 2009 Summer; 21(3):993-1011.DP

Abstract

Borderline personality disorder (BPD) represents a severe distortion in the development of attachment, self, and emotion regulation. Study of children at high risk of developing BPD may inform precursors to BPD. In a low socioeconomic status sample of 30 children aged 4-7 whose mothers have BPD and 30 normative comparisons, representations of the caregiver-child relationship and of the self, and emotion regulation were assessed with a story-stem completion measure. In contrast to comparisons and controlling for major depressive disorder, children whose mothers have BPD told stories with the following: (a) more parent-child role reversal, more fear of abandonment, and more negative mother-child and father-child relationship expectations; (b) more incongruent and shameful representations of the self; and (c) poorer emotion regulation indicated by more confusion of boundaries between fantasy and reality and between self and fantasy, more fantasy proneness, less narrative coherence, and marginally more intrusion of traumatic themes. In the sample as a whole, (a) a maladaptive caregiver-child relationship composite was associated with maternal identity disturbance and self-harm; (b) a maladaptive self-composite was associated with maternal self-harm; and (c) a maladaptive emotion regulation composite was associated with maternal identity disturbance, negative relationships, and self-harm. Results are discussed in terms of putative precursors to BPD and preventive interventions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-0900, USA. macfie@utk.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19583894

Citation

Macfie, Jenny, and Scott A. Swan. "Representations of the Caregiver-child Relationship and of the Self, and Emotion Regulation in the Narratives of Young Children Whose Mothers Have Borderline Personality Disorder." Development and Psychopathology, vol. 21, no. 3, 2009, pp. 993-1011.
Macfie J, Swan SA. Representations of the caregiver-child relationship and of the self, and emotion regulation in the narratives of young children whose mothers have borderline personality disorder. Dev Psychopathol. 2009;21(3):993-1011.
Macfie, J., & Swan, S. A. (2009). Representations of the caregiver-child relationship and of the self, and emotion regulation in the narratives of young children whose mothers have borderline personality disorder. Development and Psychopathology, 21(3), 993-1011. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0954579409000534
Macfie J, Swan SA. Representations of the Caregiver-child Relationship and of the Self, and Emotion Regulation in the Narratives of Young Children Whose Mothers Have Borderline Personality Disorder. Dev Psychopathol. 2009;21(3):993-1011. PubMed PMID: 19583894.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Representations of the caregiver-child relationship and of the self, and emotion regulation in the narratives of young children whose mothers have borderline personality disorder. AU - Macfie,Jenny, AU - Swan,Scott A, PY - 2009/7/9/entrez PY - 2009/7/9/pubmed PY - 2009/10/24/medline SP - 993 EP - 1011 JF - Development and psychopathology JO - Dev Psychopathol VL - 21 IS - 3 N2 - Borderline personality disorder (BPD) represents a severe distortion in the development of attachment, self, and emotion regulation. Study of children at high risk of developing BPD may inform precursors to BPD. In a low socioeconomic status sample of 30 children aged 4-7 whose mothers have BPD and 30 normative comparisons, representations of the caregiver-child relationship and of the self, and emotion regulation were assessed with a story-stem completion measure. In contrast to comparisons and controlling for major depressive disorder, children whose mothers have BPD told stories with the following: (a) more parent-child role reversal, more fear of abandonment, and more negative mother-child and father-child relationship expectations; (b) more incongruent and shameful representations of the self; and (c) poorer emotion regulation indicated by more confusion of boundaries between fantasy and reality and between self and fantasy, more fantasy proneness, less narrative coherence, and marginally more intrusion of traumatic themes. In the sample as a whole, (a) a maladaptive caregiver-child relationship composite was associated with maternal identity disturbance and self-harm; (b) a maladaptive self-composite was associated with maternal self-harm; and (c) a maladaptive emotion regulation composite was associated with maternal identity disturbance, negative relationships, and self-harm. Results are discussed in terms of putative precursors to BPD and preventive interventions. SN - 1469-2198 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19583894/Representations_of_the_caregiver_child_relationship_and_of_the_self_and_emotion_regulation_in_the_narratives_of_young_children_whose_mothers_have_borderline_personality_disorder_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0954579409000534/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -