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Metabolic implications of dietary trans-fatty acids.

Abstract

Dietary trans-fatty acids are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and have been implicated in the incidence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). It is established that high-fat saturated diets, relative to low-fat diets, induce adiposity and whole-body insulin resistance. Here, we test the hypothesis that markers of an obese, prediabetic state (fatty liver, visceral fat accumulation, insulin resistance) are also worsened with provision of a low-fat diet containing elaidic acid (18:1t), the predominant trans-fatty acid isomer found in the human food supply. Male 8-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a 10% trans-fatty acid enriched (LF-trans) diet for 8 weeks. At baseline, 3 and 6 weeks, in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MR) assessed intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) and intrahepatic lipid (IHL) content. Euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamps (week 8) determined whole-body and tissue-specific insulin sensitivity followed by high-resolution ex vivo 1H-NMR to assess tissue biochemistry. Rats fed the LF-trans diet were in positive energy balance, largely explained by increased energy intake, and showed significantly increased visceral fat and liver lipid accumulation relative to the low-fat control diet. Net glycogen synthesis was also increased in the LF-trans group. A reduction in glucose disposal, independent of IMCL accumulation was observed in rats fed the LF-trans diet, whereas in rats fed a 45% saturated fat (HF-sat) diet, impaired glucose disposal corresponded to increased IMCLTA. Neither diet induced an increase in IMCLsoleus. These findings imply that trans-fatty acids may alter nutrient handling in liver, adipose tissue, and skeletal muscle and that the mechanism by which trans-fatty acids induce insulin resistance differs from diets enriched with saturated fats.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Cardiovascular and Metabolism Disease Area, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Inc., Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.

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    Source

    Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.) 17:6 2009 Jun pg 1200-7

    MeSH

    Adiposity
    Animals
    Blood Glucose
    Diet, Fat-Restricted
    Energy Intake
    Energy Metabolism
    Glucose Clamp Technique
    Glycogen
    Hyperphagia
    Insulin
    Insulin Resistance
    Intra-Abdominal Fat
    Liver
    Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
    Male
    Metabolic Syndrome
    Muscle, Skeletal
    Obesity
    Oleic Acid
    Prediabetic State
    Rats
    Rats, Sprague-Dawley
    Time Factors
    Trans Fatty Acids

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    19584878

    Citation

    Dorfman, Suzanne E., et al. "Metabolic Implications of Dietary Trans-fatty Acids." Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), vol. 17, no. 6, 2009, pp. 1200-7.
    Dorfman SE, Laurent D, Gounarides JS, et al. Metabolic implications of dietary trans-fatty acids. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2009;17(6):1200-7.
    Dorfman, S. E., Laurent, D., Gounarides, J. S., Li, X., Mullarkey, T. L., Rocheford, E. C., ... Commerford, S. R. (2009). Metabolic implications of dietary trans-fatty acids. Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), 17(6), pp. 1200-7. doi:10.1038/oby.2008.662.
    Dorfman SE, et al. Metabolic Implications of Dietary Trans-fatty Acids. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2009;17(6):1200-7. PubMed PMID: 19584878.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Metabolic implications of dietary trans-fatty acids. AU - Dorfman,Suzanne E, AU - Laurent,Didier, AU - Gounarides,John S, AU - Li,Xue, AU - Mullarkey,Tara L, AU - Rocheford,Erik C, AU - Sari-Sarraf,Farid, AU - Hirsch,Erica A, AU - Hughes,Thomas E, AU - Commerford,S Renee, Y1 - 2009/02/19/ PY - 2009/7/9/entrez PY - 2009/7/9/pubmed PY - 2009/7/25/medline SP - 1200 EP - 7 JF - Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.) JO - Obesity (Silver Spring) VL - 17 IS - 6 N2 - Dietary trans-fatty acids are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and have been implicated in the incidence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). It is established that high-fat saturated diets, relative to low-fat diets, induce adiposity and whole-body insulin resistance. Here, we test the hypothesis that markers of an obese, prediabetic state (fatty liver, visceral fat accumulation, insulin resistance) are also worsened with provision of a low-fat diet containing elaidic acid (18:1t), the predominant trans-fatty acid isomer found in the human food supply. Male 8-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a 10% trans-fatty acid enriched (LF-trans) diet for 8 weeks. At baseline, 3 and 6 weeks, in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MR) assessed intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) and intrahepatic lipid (IHL) content. Euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamps (week 8) determined whole-body and tissue-specific insulin sensitivity followed by high-resolution ex vivo 1H-NMR to assess tissue biochemistry. Rats fed the LF-trans diet were in positive energy balance, largely explained by increased energy intake, and showed significantly increased visceral fat and liver lipid accumulation relative to the low-fat control diet. Net glycogen synthesis was also increased in the LF-trans group. A reduction in glucose disposal, independent of IMCL accumulation was observed in rats fed the LF-trans diet, whereas in rats fed a 45% saturated fat (HF-sat) diet, impaired glucose disposal corresponded to increased IMCLTA. Neither diet induced an increase in IMCLsoleus. These findings imply that trans-fatty acids may alter nutrient handling in liver, adipose tissue, and skeletal muscle and that the mechanism by which trans-fatty acids induce insulin resistance differs from diets enriched with saturated fats. SN - 1930-7381 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19584878/Metabolic_implications_of_dietary_trans_fatty_acids_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2008.662 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -