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Metabolic implications of dietary trans-fatty acids.
Obesity (Silver Spring) 2009; 17(6):1200-7O

Abstract

Dietary trans-fatty acids are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and have been implicated in the incidence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). It is established that high-fat saturated diets, relative to low-fat diets, induce adiposity and whole-body insulin resistance. Here, we test the hypothesis that markers of an obese, prediabetic state (fatty liver, visceral fat accumulation, insulin resistance) are also worsened with provision of a low-fat diet containing elaidic acid (18:1t), the predominant trans-fatty acid isomer found in the human food supply. Male 8-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a 10% trans-fatty acid enriched (LF-trans) diet for 8 weeks. At baseline, 3 and 6 weeks, in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MR) assessed intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) and intrahepatic lipid (IHL) content. Euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamps (week 8) determined whole-body and tissue-specific insulin sensitivity followed by high-resolution ex vivo 1H-NMR to assess tissue biochemistry. Rats fed the LF-trans diet were in positive energy balance, largely explained by increased energy intake, and showed significantly increased visceral fat and liver lipid accumulation relative to the low-fat control diet. Net glycogen synthesis was also increased in the LF-trans group. A reduction in glucose disposal, independent of IMCL accumulation was observed in rats fed the LF-trans diet, whereas in rats fed a 45% saturated fat (HF-sat) diet, impaired glucose disposal corresponded to increased IMCLTA. Neither diet induced an increase in IMCLsoleus. These findings imply that trans-fatty acids may alter nutrient handling in liver, adipose tissue, and skeletal muscle and that the mechanism by which trans-fatty acids induce insulin resistance differs from diets enriched with saturated fats.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Cardiovascular and Metabolism Disease Area, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Inc., Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19584878

Citation

Dorfman, Suzanne E., et al. "Metabolic Implications of Dietary Trans-fatty Acids." Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), vol. 17, no. 6, 2009, pp. 1200-7.
Dorfman SE, Laurent D, Gounarides JS, et al. Metabolic implications of dietary trans-fatty acids. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2009;17(6):1200-7.
Dorfman, S. E., Laurent, D., Gounarides, J. S., Li, X., Mullarkey, T. L., Rocheford, E. C., ... Commerford, S. R. (2009). Metabolic implications of dietary trans-fatty acids. Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), 17(6), pp. 1200-7. doi:10.1038/oby.2008.662.
Dorfman SE, et al. Metabolic Implications of Dietary Trans-fatty Acids. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2009;17(6):1200-7. PubMed PMID: 19584878.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Metabolic implications of dietary trans-fatty acids. AU - Dorfman,Suzanne E, AU - Laurent,Didier, AU - Gounarides,John S, AU - Li,Xue, AU - Mullarkey,Tara L, AU - Rocheford,Erik C, AU - Sari-Sarraf,Farid, AU - Hirsch,Erica A, AU - Hughes,Thomas E, AU - Commerford,S Renee, Y1 - 2009/02/19/ PY - 2009/7/9/entrez PY - 2009/7/9/pubmed PY - 2009/7/25/medline SP - 1200 EP - 7 JF - Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.) JO - Obesity (Silver Spring) VL - 17 IS - 6 N2 - Dietary trans-fatty acids are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and have been implicated in the incidence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). It is established that high-fat saturated diets, relative to low-fat diets, induce adiposity and whole-body insulin resistance. Here, we test the hypothesis that markers of an obese, prediabetic state (fatty liver, visceral fat accumulation, insulin resistance) are also worsened with provision of a low-fat diet containing elaidic acid (18:1t), the predominant trans-fatty acid isomer found in the human food supply. Male 8-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a 10% trans-fatty acid enriched (LF-trans) diet for 8 weeks. At baseline, 3 and 6 weeks, in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MR) assessed intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) and intrahepatic lipid (IHL) content. Euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamps (week 8) determined whole-body and tissue-specific insulin sensitivity followed by high-resolution ex vivo 1H-NMR to assess tissue biochemistry. Rats fed the LF-trans diet were in positive energy balance, largely explained by increased energy intake, and showed significantly increased visceral fat and liver lipid accumulation relative to the low-fat control diet. Net glycogen synthesis was also increased in the LF-trans group. A reduction in glucose disposal, independent of IMCL accumulation was observed in rats fed the LF-trans diet, whereas in rats fed a 45% saturated fat (HF-sat) diet, impaired glucose disposal corresponded to increased IMCLTA. Neither diet induced an increase in IMCLsoleus. These findings imply that trans-fatty acids may alter nutrient handling in liver, adipose tissue, and skeletal muscle and that the mechanism by which trans-fatty acids induce insulin resistance differs from diets enriched with saturated fats. SN - 1930-7381 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19584878/Metabolic_implications_of_dietary_trans_fatty_acids_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2008.662 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -