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Interpretations of parental control by Asian immigrant and European American youth.
J Fam Psychol. 2009 Jun; 23(3):342-54.JF

Abstract

Although studies have reported ethnic and cultural differences in the effects of parenting on adolescent well-being, rarely have they included specific examinations of the cultural processes underlying these differences. This study examined adolescents' affective interpretations of parents' control (i.e., feelings of anger toward control) and how these interpretations may moderate the relationship between control and adolescents' behavioral adjustment. The study comprised 1,085 immigrant youth of Chinese, Korean, and Filipino descent, and also European American youth from high schools in the greater Los Angeles area. Differences were found between European American and Asian immigrant youth in the effects of both behavioral control and psychological control. Furthermore, among European Americans only, as adolescents' feelings of anger increased, the beneficial consequences of behavioral control decreased, whereas the negative effects of psychological control on behavior problems decreased. The results suggest that feeling anger toward parents' use of psychological control may serve a protective function for European American youth but not for Asian immigrant youth. In contrast, feeling angry about behavioral control seems to reduce the beneficial consequences of control among European Americans but not Asian immigrants.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0426, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19586197

Citation

Chao, Ruth K., and Christine Aque. "Interpretations of Parental Control By Asian Immigrant and European American Youth." Journal of Family Psychology : JFP : Journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43), vol. 23, no. 3, 2009, pp. 342-54.
Chao RK, Aque C. Interpretations of parental control by Asian immigrant and European American youth. J Fam Psychol. 2009;23(3):342-54.
Chao, R. K., & Aque, C. (2009). Interpretations of parental control by Asian immigrant and European American youth. Journal of Family Psychology : JFP : Journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43), 23(3), 342-54. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0015828
Chao RK, Aque C. Interpretations of Parental Control By Asian Immigrant and European American Youth. J Fam Psychol. 2009;23(3):342-54. PubMed PMID: 19586197.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Interpretations of parental control by Asian immigrant and European American youth. AU - Chao,Ruth K, AU - Aque,Christine, PY - 2009/7/10/entrez PY - 2009/7/10/pubmed PY - 2009/8/6/medline SP - 342 EP - 54 JF - Journal of family psychology : JFP : journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43) JO - J Fam Psychol VL - 23 IS - 3 N2 - Although studies have reported ethnic and cultural differences in the effects of parenting on adolescent well-being, rarely have they included specific examinations of the cultural processes underlying these differences. This study examined adolescents' affective interpretations of parents' control (i.e., feelings of anger toward control) and how these interpretations may moderate the relationship between control and adolescents' behavioral adjustment. The study comprised 1,085 immigrant youth of Chinese, Korean, and Filipino descent, and also European American youth from high schools in the greater Los Angeles area. Differences were found between European American and Asian immigrant youth in the effects of both behavioral control and psychological control. Furthermore, among European Americans only, as adolescents' feelings of anger increased, the beneficial consequences of behavioral control decreased, whereas the negative effects of psychological control on behavior problems decreased. The results suggest that feeling anger toward parents' use of psychological control may serve a protective function for European American youth but not for Asian immigrant youth. In contrast, feeling angry about behavioral control seems to reduce the beneficial consequences of control among European Americans but not Asian immigrants. SN - 0893-3200 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19586197/Interpretations_of_parental_control_by_Asian_immigrant_and_European_American_youth_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/fam/23/3/342 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -