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How much do I tell thee? Strategies for managing information to parents among American adolescents from Chinese, Mexican, and European backgrounds.
J Fam Psychol. 2009 Jun; 23(3):364-74.JF

Abstract

Strategies for managing information about activities to parents, including partial disclosure, avoidance, lying, and full disclosure, were examined in 479 American adolescents (M = 16.38 years, SD = 0.77) varying in generational status and from Mexican, Chinese, and European backgrounds. Information management strategies for personal, prudential, and overlapping (multifaceted) activities as defined within social domain theory were examined. With age, parental education, and generational status controlled, Chinese American adolescents partially disclosed more to mothers about personal and multifaceted activities than did Mexican American adolescents and more to fathers about personal activities than did European American teens. In contrast, European and Mexican American adolescents fully disclosed more to mothers about personal activities than did Chinese-origin adolescents. Strategies varied by generation among Chinese American youth; second-generation adolescents avoided discussing activities with parents more than did immigrants. Adolescents who fully disclosed about all activities and lied less about multifaceted and personal activities reported stronger endorsement of obligations to assist their families, more trust in parents, and less problem behavior. More depressed mood was associated with more lying about personal activities.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical and Social Sciences in Psychology, University of Rochester, NY 14627, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19586199

Citation

Tasopoulos-Chan, Marina, et al. "How Much Do I Tell Thee? Strategies for Managing Information to Parents Among American Adolescents From Chinese, Mexican, and European Backgrounds." Journal of Family Psychology : JFP : Journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43), vol. 23, no. 3, 2009, pp. 364-74.
Tasopoulos-Chan M, Smetana JG, Yau JP. How much do I tell thee? Strategies for managing information to parents among American adolescents from Chinese, Mexican, and European backgrounds. J Fam Psychol. 2009;23(3):364-74.
Tasopoulos-Chan, M., Smetana, J. G., & Yau, J. P. (2009). How much do I tell thee? Strategies for managing information to parents among American adolescents from Chinese, Mexican, and European backgrounds. Journal of Family Psychology : JFP : Journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43), 23(3), 364-74. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0015816
Tasopoulos-Chan M, Smetana JG, Yau JP. How Much Do I Tell Thee? Strategies for Managing Information to Parents Among American Adolescents From Chinese, Mexican, and European Backgrounds. J Fam Psychol. 2009;23(3):364-74. PubMed PMID: 19586199.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - How much do I tell thee? Strategies for managing information to parents among American adolescents from Chinese, Mexican, and European backgrounds. AU - Tasopoulos-Chan,Marina, AU - Smetana,Judith G, AU - Yau,Jenny P, PY - 2009/7/10/entrez PY - 2009/7/10/pubmed PY - 2009/8/6/medline SP - 364 EP - 74 JF - Journal of family psychology : JFP : journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43) JO - J Fam Psychol VL - 23 IS - 3 N2 - Strategies for managing information about activities to parents, including partial disclosure, avoidance, lying, and full disclosure, were examined in 479 American adolescents (M = 16.38 years, SD = 0.77) varying in generational status and from Mexican, Chinese, and European backgrounds. Information management strategies for personal, prudential, and overlapping (multifaceted) activities as defined within social domain theory were examined. With age, parental education, and generational status controlled, Chinese American adolescents partially disclosed more to mothers about personal and multifaceted activities than did Mexican American adolescents and more to fathers about personal activities than did European American teens. In contrast, European and Mexican American adolescents fully disclosed more to mothers about personal activities than did Chinese-origin adolescents. Strategies varied by generation among Chinese American youth; second-generation adolescents avoided discussing activities with parents more than did immigrants. Adolescents who fully disclosed about all activities and lied less about multifaceted and personal activities reported stronger endorsement of obligations to assist their families, more trust in parents, and less problem behavior. More depressed mood was associated with more lying about personal activities. SN - 0893-3200 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19586199/How_much_do_I_tell_thee_Strategies_for_managing_information_to_parents_among_American_adolescents_from_Chinese_Mexican_and_European_backgrounds_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/fam/23/3/364 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -