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A critical review on a globally-licensed, live, orally-administrable, monovalent human rotavirus vaccine: Rotarix.
Expert Opin Biol Ther. 2009 Aug; 9(8):1073-86.EO

Abstract

Rotavirus is the major cause of severe gastroenteritis in children worldwide, and two, live, orally-administrable vaccines are licensed globally. They are Rotarix, a monovalent, human rotavirus-based vaccine (GlaxoSmithKline), and RotaTeq, a pentavalent, bovine-human reassortant vaccine (Merck). The RIX4414 strain, a G1P[8] virus, is contained in the Rotarix vaccine. It grows efficiently in the human intestine, as evidenced by vaccine virus shedding into faeces. Efficient multiplication of RIX4414 in the intestines may play a role in stimulating immune effectors other than neutralizing antibodies that may explain the protective immunity against fully heterotypic G2P[4] strains. The protective efficacy against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis afforded by Rotarix is consistently better against strains that share with RIX4414 both G and P serotypes (i.e., G1P[8]), or only P serotype (i.e., G3P[8], G4P[8] and G9P[8]). The Rotarix vaccine is safe regarding intussusception if its first dose is administered between 6 and 12 weeks of age and the last dose by 24 weeks of age with a minimum interval of 4 weeks between the two doses. The expansion by Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, USA, of the age limit for the first dose to age <15 weeks, and the last dose by 8 months requires close monitoring.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Nagasaki University, The Global Centre of Excellence, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Nagasaki, Japan.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19591630

Citation

Nakagomi, Toyoko, and Osamu Nakagomi. "A Critical Review On a Globally-licensed, Live, Orally-administrable, Monovalent Human Rotavirus Vaccine: Rotarix." Expert Opinion On Biological Therapy, vol. 9, no. 8, 2009, pp. 1073-86.
Nakagomi T, Nakagomi O. A critical review on a globally-licensed, live, orally-administrable, monovalent human rotavirus vaccine: Rotarix. Expert Opin Biol Ther. 2009;9(8):1073-86.
Nakagomi, T., & Nakagomi, O. (2009). A critical review on a globally-licensed, live, orally-administrable, monovalent human rotavirus vaccine: Rotarix. Expert Opinion On Biological Therapy, 9(8), 1073-86. https://doi.org/10.1517/14712590903103787
Nakagomi T, Nakagomi O. A Critical Review On a Globally-licensed, Live, Orally-administrable, Monovalent Human Rotavirus Vaccine: Rotarix. Expert Opin Biol Ther. 2009;9(8):1073-86. PubMed PMID: 19591630.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A critical review on a globally-licensed, live, orally-administrable, monovalent human rotavirus vaccine: Rotarix. AU - Nakagomi,Toyoko, AU - Nakagomi,Osamu, PY - 2009/7/14/entrez PY - 2009/7/14/pubmed PY - 2009/11/5/medline SP - 1073 EP - 86 JF - Expert opinion on biological therapy JO - Expert Opin Biol Ther VL - 9 IS - 8 N2 - Rotavirus is the major cause of severe gastroenteritis in children worldwide, and two, live, orally-administrable vaccines are licensed globally. They are Rotarix, a monovalent, human rotavirus-based vaccine (GlaxoSmithKline), and RotaTeq, a pentavalent, bovine-human reassortant vaccine (Merck). The RIX4414 strain, a G1P[8] virus, is contained in the Rotarix vaccine. It grows efficiently in the human intestine, as evidenced by vaccine virus shedding into faeces. Efficient multiplication of RIX4414 in the intestines may play a role in stimulating immune effectors other than neutralizing antibodies that may explain the protective immunity against fully heterotypic G2P[4] strains. The protective efficacy against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis afforded by Rotarix is consistently better against strains that share with RIX4414 both G and P serotypes (i.e., G1P[8]), or only P serotype (i.e., G3P[8], G4P[8] and G9P[8]). The Rotarix vaccine is safe regarding intussusception if its first dose is administered between 6 and 12 weeks of age and the last dose by 24 weeks of age with a minimum interval of 4 weeks between the two doses. The expansion by Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, USA, of the age limit for the first dose to age <15 weeks, and the last dose by 8 months requires close monitoring. SN - 1744-7682 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19591630/A_critical_review_on_a_globally_licensed_live_orally_administrable_monovalent_human_rotavirus_vaccine:_Rotarix_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1517/14712590903103787 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -