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Living alone is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus in men but not women from the general population: the MONICA/KORA Augsburg Cohort Study.
Psychosom Med 2009; 71(7):784-8PM

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine sex-specific associations between living alone and incident Type 2 diabetes mellitus in a representative population sample in Germany.

METHODS

The study was based on 4424 men and 4380 women (aged 35-74 years) who participated in one of the three Monitoring trends and determinants on cardiovascular diseases Augsburg surveys between 1984 and 1995 and who were free of diabetes at baseline. Sex-specific hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated from Cox proportional hazard models.

RESULTS

A total of 402 cases of incident Type 2 diabetes among men and 271 among women were registered during the mean follow-up period of 10.9 years. Living alone was significantly associated with incident Type 2 diabetes in men but not in women. After adjustment for age, survey, parental history of diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, smoking, physical activity, alcohol intake, and body mass index, the risk of developing diabetes for those who lived alone at baseline compared with those who did not live alone was 1.69 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.19-2.37) in men and 0.85 (95% CI, 0.57-1.24) in women; the p value for the sex interaction was .006 in this model. Inclusion of education and depressed mood in the models in addition to other risk factors had no impact on the observed HRs in women and even increased the risk in men (women: HR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.52-1.32; men: HR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.33-2.70).

CONCLUSIONS

Living alone is an independent predictor of Type 2 diabetes in men but not in women from the general population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health (GmbH), Institute of Epidemiology, Neuherberg, Germany. christa.meisinger@helmholtz-muenchen.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19592514

Citation

Meisinger, Christa, et al. "Living Alone Is Associated With an Increased Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Men but Not Women From the General Population: the MONICA/KORA Augsburg Cohort Study." Psychosomatic Medicine, vol. 71, no. 7, 2009, pp. 784-8.
Meisinger C, Kandler U, Ladwig KH. Living alone is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus in men but not women from the general population: the MONICA/KORA Augsburg Cohort Study. Psychosom Med. 2009;71(7):784-8.
Meisinger, C., Kandler, U., & Ladwig, K. H. (2009). Living alone is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus in men but not women from the general population: the MONICA/KORA Augsburg Cohort Study. Psychosomatic Medicine, 71(7), pp. 784-8. doi:10.1097/PSY.0b013e3181ae5770.
Meisinger C, Kandler U, Ladwig KH. Living Alone Is Associated With an Increased Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Men but Not Women From the General Population: the MONICA/KORA Augsburg Cohort Study. Psychosom Med. 2009;71(7):784-8. PubMed PMID: 19592514.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Living alone is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus in men but not women from the general population: the MONICA/KORA Augsburg Cohort Study. AU - Meisinger,Christa, AU - Kandler,Ulla, AU - Ladwig,Karl-Heinz, Y1 - 2009/07/10/ PY - 2009/7/14/entrez PY - 2009/7/14/pubmed PY - 2009/10/30/medline SP - 784 EP - 8 JF - Psychosomatic medicine JO - Psychosom Med VL - 71 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine sex-specific associations between living alone and incident Type 2 diabetes mellitus in a representative population sample in Germany. METHODS: The study was based on 4424 men and 4380 women (aged 35-74 years) who participated in one of the three Monitoring trends and determinants on cardiovascular diseases Augsburg surveys between 1984 and 1995 and who were free of diabetes at baseline. Sex-specific hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated from Cox proportional hazard models. RESULTS: A total of 402 cases of incident Type 2 diabetes among men and 271 among women were registered during the mean follow-up period of 10.9 years. Living alone was significantly associated with incident Type 2 diabetes in men but not in women. After adjustment for age, survey, parental history of diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, smoking, physical activity, alcohol intake, and body mass index, the risk of developing diabetes for those who lived alone at baseline compared with those who did not live alone was 1.69 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.19-2.37) in men and 0.85 (95% CI, 0.57-1.24) in women; the p value for the sex interaction was .006 in this model. Inclusion of education and depressed mood in the models in addition to other risk factors had no impact on the observed HRs in women and even increased the risk in men (women: HR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.52-1.32; men: HR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.33-2.70). CONCLUSIONS: Living alone is an independent predictor of Type 2 diabetes in men but not in women from the general population. SN - 1534-7796 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19592514/Living_alone_is_associated_with_an_increased_risk_of_type_2_diabetes_mellitus_in_men_but_not_women_from_the_general_population:_the_MONICA/KORA_Augsburg_Cohort_Study_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=19592514 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -