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Regret and rationalization among smokers in Thailand and Malaysia: findings from the International Tobacco Control Southeast Asia Survey.
Health Psychol. 2009 Jul; 28(4):457-64.HP

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To test whether differences of history and strength in tobacco control policies will influence social norms, which, in turn, will influence quit intentions, by influencing smokers' regret and rationalization.

DESIGN

The data were from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Policy Evaluation Southeast Asia Survey, a cohort survey of representative samples of adult smokers in Thailand (N = 2,000) and Malaysia (N = 2,006). The survey used a stratified multistage sampling design.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Measures included regret, rationalization, social norms, and quit intention.

RESULTS

Thai smokers were more likely to have quit intentions than Malaysian smokers. This difference in quit intentions was, in part, explained by the country differences in social norms, regret, and rationalization. Reflecting Thailand's history of stronger tobacco control policies, Thai smokers, compared with Malaysian smokers, perceived more negative social norms toward smoking, were more likely to regret, and less likely to rationalize smoking. Mediational analyses revealed that these differences in social norms, accounted, in part, for the country-quit intention relation and that regret and rationalization accounted, in part, for the social norm-quit intention relation.

CONCLUSION

The results suggest that social norms toward smoking, which are shaped by tobacco control policies, and smokers' regret and rationalization influence quit intentions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. w23lee@watarts.uwaterloo.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19594270

Citation

Lee, Wonkyong B., et al. "Regret and Rationalization Among Smokers in Thailand and Malaysia: Findings From the International Tobacco Control Southeast Asia Survey." Health Psychology : Official Journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association, vol. 28, no. 4, 2009, pp. 457-64.
Lee WB, Fong GT, Zanna MP, et al. Regret and rationalization among smokers in Thailand and Malaysia: findings from the International Tobacco Control Southeast Asia Survey. Health Psychol. 2009;28(4):457-64.
Lee, W. B., Fong, G. T., Zanna, M. P., Omar, M., Sirirassamee, B., & Borland, R. (2009). Regret and rationalization among smokers in Thailand and Malaysia: findings from the International Tobacco Control Southeast Asia Survey. Health Psychology : Official Journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association, 28(4), 457-64. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0014669
Lee WB, et al. Regret and Rationalization Among Smokers in Thailand and Malaysia: Findings From the International Tobacco Control Southeast Asia Survey. Health Psychol. 2009;28(4):457-64. PubMed PMID: 19594270.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Regret and rationalization among smokers in Thailand and Malaysia: findings from the International Tobacco Control Southeast Asia Survey. AU - Lee,Wonkyong B, AU - Fong,Geoffrey T, AU - Zanna,Mark P, AU - Omar,Maizurah, AU - Sirirassamee,Buppha, AU - Borland,Ron, PY - 2009/7/15/entrez PY - 2009/7/15/pubmed PY - 2009/9/26/medline SP - 457 EP - 64 JF - Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association JO - Health Psychol VL - 28 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To test whether differences of history and strength in tobacco control policies will influence social norms, which, in turn, will influence quit intentions, by influencing smokers' regret and rationalization. DESIGN: The data were from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Policy Evaluation Southeast Asia Survey, a cohort survey of representative samples of adult smokers in Thailand (N = 2,000) and Malaysia (N = 2,006). The survey used a stratified multistage sampling design. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Measures included regret, rationalization, social norms, and quit intention. RESULTS: Thai smokers were more likely to have quit intentions than Malaysian smokers. This difference in quit intentions was, in part, explained by the country differences in social norms, regret, and rationalization. Reflecting Thailand's history of stronger tobacco control policies, Thai smokers, compared with Malaysian smokers, perceived more negative social norms toward smoking, were more likely to regret, and less likely to rationalize smoking. Mediational analyses revealed that these differences in social norms, accounted, in part, for the country-quit intention relation and that regret and rationalization accounted, in part, for the social norm-quit intention relation. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that social norms toward smoking, which are shaped by tobacco control policies, and smokers' regret and rationalization influence quit intentions. SN - 0278-6133 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19594270/Regret_and_rationalization_among_smokers_in_Thailand_and_Malaysia:_findings_from_the_International_Tobacco_Control_Southeast_Asia_Survey_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/hea/28/4/457 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -