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Effects of essential oil treatment, gas atmosphere, and storage temperature on Listeria monocytogenes in a model vegetable system.
J Food Prot. 2009 Jun; 72(6):1209-15.JF

Abstract

Natural antimicrobials such as plant essential oils (EOs) may be useful for controlling pathogenic bacteria on fresh-cut vegetables. The antilisterial properties of EOs (thyme, oregano, and rosemary), in combination with different storage atmospheres (air, 5% CO2-2% O2-93% N2, and 20% CO2-1% O2-79% N2) and temperatures (4 and 80C), were examined using a gas flow-through system combined with a vegetable agar model. The antimicrobial effects of the EOs varied depending on the oil, the Listeria strain and species, the method of application, and the storage conditions tested. Using the disk diffusion assay, the antilisterial effectiveness of the oils was in the following order: thyme EO > oregano EO > rosemary EO. Volatiles released from the EOs resulted in very small antilisterial effects, indicating that the oils needed to be in direct contact with cultures in order to be effective. There were strain and species effects, with L. innocua NCTC 11288 exhibiting the strongest resistance to EOs, and L. monocytogenes NCTC 7973 being the most sensitive strain. In addition, the effectiveness of the EOs was influenced by storage atmosphere and temperature. Use of EOs in combination with a gas atmosphere of 20% CO2-1% O2-79% N2 had the greatest antilisterial effect, suggesting that high CO2 atmospheres enhanced the antilisterial properties of EOs. Lowering the storage temperature from 8 to 4OC improved the antilisterial activity of thyme oil. It is concluded that thyme and oregano EOs display strong inhibitory effects against Listeria and that increasing CO2 levels and lowering storage temperatures further enhance these antilisterial effects.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Food Science Research Centre, Department of Life Sciences, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19610331

Citation

Scollard, Johann, et al. "Effects of Essential Oil Treatment, Gas Atmosphere, and Storage Temperature On Listeria Monocytogenes in a Model Vegetable System." Journal of Food Protection, vol. 72, no. 6, 2009, pp. 1209-15.
Scollard J, Francis GA, O'Beirne D. Effects of essential oil treatment, gas atmosphere, and storage temperature on Listeria monocytogenes in a model vegetable system. J Food Prot. 2009;72(6):1209-15.
Scollard, J., Francis, G. A., & O'Beirne, D. (2009). Effects of essential oil treatment, gas atmosphere, and storage temperature on Listeria monocytogenes in a model vegetable system. Journal of Food Protection, 72(6), 1209-15.
Scollard J, Francis GA, O'Beirne D. Effects of Essential Oil Treatment, Gas Atmosphere, and Storage Temperature On Listeria Monocytogenes in a Model Vegetable System. J Food Prot. 2009;72(6):1209-15. PubMed PMID: 19610331.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of essential oil treatment, gas atmosphere, and storage temperature on Listeria monocytogenes in a model vegetable system. AU - Scollard,Johann, AU - Francis,Gillian A, AU - O'Beirne,David, PY - 2009/7/21/entrez PY - 2009/7/21/pubmed PY - 2009/9/2/medline SP - 1209 EP - 15 JF - Journal of food protection JO - J Food Prot VL - 72 IS - 6 N2 - Natural antimicrobials such as plant essential oils (EOs) may be useful for controlling pathogenic bacteria on fresh-cut vegetables. The antilisterial properties of EOs (thyme, oregano, and rosemary), in combination with different storage atmospheres (air, 5% CO2-2% O2-93% N2, and 20% CO2-1% O2-79% N2) and temperatures (4 and 80C), were examined using a gas flow-through system combined with a vegetable agar model. The antimicrobial effects of the EOs varied depending on the oil, the Listeria strain and species, the method of application, and the storage conditions tested. Using the disk diffusion assay, the antilisterial effectiveness of the oils was in the following order: thyme EO > oregano EO > rosemary EO. Volatiles released from the EOs resulted in very small antilisterial effects, indicating that the oils needed to be in direct contact with cultures in order to be effective. There were strain and species effects, with L. innocua NCTC 11288 exhibiting the strongest resistance to EOs, and L. monocytogenes NCTC 7973 being the most sensitive strain. In addition, the effectiveness of the EOs was influenced by storage atmosphere and temperature. Use of EOs in combination with a gas atmosphere of 20% CO2-1% O2-79% N2 had the greatest antilisterial effect, suggesting that high CO2 atmospheres enhanced the antilisterial properties of EOs. Lowering the storage temperature from 8 to 4OC improved the antilisterial activity of thyme oil. It is concluded that thyme and oregano EOs display strong inhibitory effects against Listeria and that increasing CO2 levels and lowering storage temperatures further enhance these antilisterial effects. SN - 0362-028X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19610331/Effects_of_essential_oil_treatment_gas_atmosphere_and_storage_temperature_on_Listeria_monocytogenes_in_a_model_vegetable_system_ L2 - https://meridian.allenpress.com/jfp/article-lookup/doi/10.4315/0362-028x-72.6.1209 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -