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Effect of carbohydrate-electrolyte sports beverages on urinary stone risk factors.
J Urol. 2009 Sep; 182(3):992-7.JU

Abstract

PURPOSE

We evaluated the effects of consuming carbohydrate-electrolyte sports beverages (Gatorade((R))) on urinary stone risk factors.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Twelve normal subjects (5 men, 7 women) and 12 hypercalciuric stone formers (2 men, 10 women) participated in a 4-week prospective, crossover study consisting of 3 study phases. In phase 1 subjects were placed on a monitored stone prevention diet that was continued throughout the study. In phase 2 subjects ingested 2 l Gatorade daily followed by a 7-day washout period. In phase 3 subjects ingested 2 l water daily. On the final day of phases 1, 2 and 3 a 24-hour urine collection and blood sample were analyzed for stone risk factors. Effects of group and phase were tested using repeated measures ANOVA and paired t tests.

RESULTS

Changes in urinary risk factors after Gatorade consumption revealed no statistically significant difference between normal subjects and stone formers. However, intrasubject variation occurred in both groups. Gatorade consumption in both groups increased urinary pH (p = 0.006), urinary chloride (p = 0.044) and urinary sodium (p = 0.008), and decreased urinary potassium (p = 0.035) and urinary uric acid (p = 0.019) in a statistically significant manner. In response to Gatorade consumption urinary volume, calcium and citrate were unchanged compared to water consumption and baseline.

CONCLUSIONS

Gatorade increased mean urinary sodium and chloride levels compared to water and baseline. However, the results were within normal urinary parameters. The change did not appear to be clinically significant as urinary calcium was unchanged. Overall consumption of Gatorade does not increase or decrease urinary stone risk factors.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213, USA. diendn@upmc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19616798

Citation

Sweeney, Danielle D., et al. "Effect of Carbohydrate-electrolyte Sports Beverages On Urinary Stone Risk Factors." The Journal of Urology, vol. 182, no. 3, 2009, pp. 992-7.
Sweeney DD, Tomaszewski JJ, Ricchiuti DD, et al. Effect of carbohydrate-electrolyte sports beverages on urinary stone risk factors. J Urol. 2009;182(3):992-7.
Sweeney, D. D., Tomaszewski, J. J., Ricchiuti, D. D., & Averch, T. D. (2009). Effect of carbohydrate-electrolyte sports beverages on urinary stone risk factors. The Journal of Urology, 182(3), 992-7. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.juro.2009.05.020
Sweeney DD, et al. Effect of Carbohydrate-electrolyte Sports Beverages On Urinary Stone Risk Factors. J Urol. 2009;182(3):992-7. PubMed PMID: 19616798.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of carbohydrate-electrolyte sports beverages on urinary stone risk factors. AU - Sweeney,Danielle D, AU - Tomaszewski,Jeffrey J, AU - Ricchiuti,Daniel D, AU - Averch,Timothy D, Y1 - 2009/07/18/ PY - 2009/01/07/received PY - 2009/7/21/entrez PY - 2009/7/21/pubmed PY - 2009/9/9/medline SP - 992 EP - 7 JF - The Journal of urology JO - J. Urol. VL - 182 IS - 3 N2 - PURPOSE: We evaluated the effects of consuming carbohydrate-electrolyte sports beverages (Gatorade((R))) on urinary stone risk factors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twelve normal subjects (5 men, 7 women) and 12 hypercalciuric stone formers (2 men, 10 women) participated in a 4-week prospective, crossover study consisting of 3 study phases. In phase 1 subjects were placed on a monitored stone prevention diet that was continued throughout the study. In phase 2 subjects ingested 2 l Gatorade daily followed by a 7-day washout period. In phase 3 subjects ingested 2 l water daily. On the final day of phases 1, 2 and 3 a 24-hour urine collection and blood sample were analyzed for stone risk factors. Effects of group and phase were tested using repeated measures ANOVA and paired t tests. RESULTS: Changes in urinary risk factors after Gatorade consumption revealed no statistically significant difference between normal subjects and stone formers. However, intrasubject variation occurred in both groups. Gatorade consumption in both groups increased urinary pH (p = 0.006), urinary chloride (p = 0.044) and urinary sodium (p = 0.008), and decreased urinary potassium (p = 0.035) and urinary uric acid (p = 0.019) in a statistically significant manner. In response to Gatorade consumption urinary volume, calcium and citrate were unchanged compared to water consumption and baseline. CONCLUSIONS: Gatorade increased mean urinary sodium and chloride levels compared to water and baseline. However, the results were within normal urinary parameters. The change did not appear to be clinically significant as urinary calcium was unchanged. Overall consumption of Gatorade does not increase or decrease urinary stone risk factors. SN - 1527-3792 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19616798/Effect_of_carbohydrate_electrolyte_sports_beverages_on_urinary_stone_risk_factors_ L2 - https://www.jurology.com/doi/full/10.1016/j.juro.2009.05.020?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -