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Metabolic syndrome and its association with white blood cell count in children and adolescents in Korea: the 2005 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis 2010; 20(3):165-72NM

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS

To estimate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) and determine its association with white blood cell (WBC) count as a marker of low-grade systemic inflammation in children and adolescents in Korea.

METHODS AND RESULTS

We investigated the prevalence of MS and its association with WBC count in 928 children and adolescents. MS was defined as having 3 or more conditions based on the modified criteria of the National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III). The odds ratios (ORs) for MS were also calculated using multivariate logistic regression analysis across WBC count quartiles (Q1, <5200; Q2, 5200-6100; Q3, 6200-7200; and Q4, >or=7300 cells/microL for boys; Q1, <5200; Q2, 5200-6000; Q3, 6100-7000; and Q4, >or=7100 cells/microL for girls). The prevalence of MS in children and adolescents in Korea was 6.7% (8.5% in boys, 4.5% in girls, P<0.001). MS was more prevalent in overweight and obese children and adolescents in both boys and girls. The mean WBC counts continuously increased with each additional component of MS in both boys and girls. The ORs (95% CIs) for MS in each WBC quartile were 1.00, 1.56 (0.43-5.67), 4.47 (1.42-14.07), and 5.25 (1.71-16.07) in boys and 1.00, 1.05 (0.15-7.61), 2.89 (0.55-15.17), and 7.47 (1.61-36.67) in girls after adjusting for age, household income, and residential area.

CONCLUSION

In summary, this study shows that a substantial number of children and adolescents in Korea have MS, and elevated WBC count may be a surrogate marker for MS.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Family Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19616924

Citation

Lee, Y-J, et al. "Metabolic Syndrome and Its Association With White Blood Cell Count in Children and Adolescents in Korea: the 2005 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey." Nutrition, Metabolism, and Cardiovascular Diseases : NMCD, vol. 20, no. 3, 2010, pp. 165-72.
Lee YJ, Shin YH, Kim JK, et al. Metabolic syndrome and its association with white blood cell count in children and adolescents in Korea: the 2005 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2010;20(3):165-72.
Lee, Y. J., Shin, Y. H., Kim, J. K., Shim, J. Y., Kang, D. R., & Lee, H. R. (2010). Metabolic syndrome and its association with white blood cell count in children and adolescents in Korea: the 2005 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Nutrition, Metabolism, and Cardiovascular Diseases : NMCD, 20(3), pp. 165-72. doi:10.1016/j.numecd.2009.03.017.
Lee YJ, et al. Metabolic Syndrome and Its Association With White Blood Cell Count in Children and Adolescents in Korea: the 2005 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2010;20(3):165-72. PubMed PMID: 19616924.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Metabolic syndrome and its association with white blood cell count in children and adolescents in Korea: the 2005 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. AU - Lee,Y-J, AU - Shin,Y-H, AU - Kim,J-K, AU - Shim,J-Y, AU - Kang,D-R, AU - Lee,H-R, Y1 - 2009/07/19/ PY - 2008/10/10/received PY - 2009/03/10/revised PY - 2009/03/15/accepted PY - 2009/7/21/entrez PY - 2009/7/21/pubmed PY - 2010/5/29/medline SP - 165 EP - 72 JF - Nutrition, metabolism, and cardiovascular diseases : NMCD JO - Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis VL - 20 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND AND AIMS: To estimate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) and determine its association with white blood cell (WBC) count as a marker of low-grade systemic inflammation in children and adolescents in Korea. METHODS AND RESULTS: We investigated the prevalence of MS and its association with WBC count in 928 children and adolescents. MS was defined as having 3 or more conditions based on the modified criteria of the National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III). The odds ratios (ORs) for MS were also calculated using multivariate logistic regression analysis across WBC count quartiles (Q1, <5200; Q2, 5200-6100; Q3, 6200-7200; and Q4, >or=7300 cells/microL for boys; Q1, <5200; Q2, 5200-6000; Q3, 6100-7000; and Q4, >or=7100 cells/microL for girls). The prevalence of MS in children and adolescents in Korea was 6.7% (8.5% in boys, 4.5% in girls, P<0.001). MS was more prevalent in overweight and obese children and adolescents in both boys and girls. The mean WBC counts continuously increased with each additional component of MS in both boys and girls. The ORs (95% CIs) for MS in each WBC quartile were 1.00, 1.56 (0.43-5.67), 4.47 (1.42-14.07), and 5.25 (1.71-16.07) in boys and 1.00, 1.05 (0.15-7.61), 2.89 (0.55-15.17), and 7.47 (1.61-36.67) in girls after adjusting for age, household income, and residential area. CONCLUSION: In summary, this study shows that a substantial number of children and adolescents in Korea have MS, and elevated WBC count may be a surrogate marker for MS. SN - 1590-3729 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19616924/Metabolic_syndrome_and_its_association_with_white_blood_cell_count_in_children_and_adolescents_in_Korea:_the_2005_Korean_National_Health_and_Nutrition_Examination_Survey_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0939-4753(09)00072-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -