Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

A tale of three hospitals: solving learning and workforce needs together.
Med J Aust. 2009 Jul 20; 191(2):105-9.MJ

Abstract

Major developments in medical education in Australia include increasing the numbers of students and educating more students within the community and in regional, rural and remote settings. Rapid growth of student numbers and the rural orientation of the James Cook University medical school course has meant that northern Queensland had to deal with these issues earlier than other regions. One solution has been to transform some rural hospitals into teaching health services. Two hospitals that have successfully made this transformation, and another on its way, suggest that important factors include local commitment to quality clinical services, medical and academic leadership, coordination of local resources, community support, and strategic links between key organisations. Transformation to a teaching health service involves senior doctors functioning as true consultants with cascading supervision as in the traditional consultant-registrar-resident model. As both clinical and teaching capacity develops, the workforce may stabilise, infrastructure and teaching culture are established, and long-term recruitment and retention strategies emerge. Applying these models in other rural and community settings may make it possible to manage the increased training capacity and address workforce needs without compromising the educational experience - indeed, it may be enhanced.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Medicine and Dentistry, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, Australia. Tarun.Sengupta@jcu.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19619098

Citation

Gupta, Tarun K Sen, et al. "A Tale of Three Hospitals: Solving Learning and Workforce Needs Together." The Medical Journal of Australia, vol. 191, no. 2, 2009, pp. 105-9.
Gupta TK, Murray RB, Beaton NS, et al. A tale of three hospitals: solving learning and workforce needs together. Med J Aust. 2009;191(2):105-9.
Gupta, T. K., Murray, R. B., Beaton, N. S., Farlow, D. J., Jukka, C. B., & Coventry, N. L. (2009). A tale of three hospitals: solving learning and workforce needs together. The Medical Journal of Australia, 191(2), 105-9.
Gupta TK, et al. A Tale of Three Hospitals: Solving Learning and Workforce Needs Together. Med J Aust. 2009 Jul 20;191(2):105-9. PubMed PMID: 19619098.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A tale of three hospitals: solving learning and workforce needs together. AU - Gupta,Tarun K Sen, AU - Murray,Richard B, AU - Beaton,Neil S, AU - Farlow,David J, AU - Jukka,Clare B, AU - Coventry,Natasha L, PY - 2009/04/14/received PY - 2009/06/02/accepted PY - 2009/7/22/entrez PY - 2009/7/22/pubmed PY - 2009/9/26/medline SP - 105 EP - 9 JF - The Medical journal of Australia JO - Med. J. Aust. VL - 191 IS - 2 N2 - Major developments in medical education in Australia include increasing the numbers of students and educating more students within the community and in regional, rural and remote settings. Rapid growth of student numbers and the rural orientation of the James Cook University medical school course has meant that northern Queensland had to deal with these issues earlier than other regions. One solution has been to transform some rural hospitals into teaching health services. Two hospitals that have successfully made this transformation, and another on its way, suggest that important factors include local commitment to quality clinical services, medical and academic leadership, coordination of local resources, community support, and strategic links between key organisations. Transformation to a teaching health service involves senior doctors functioning as true consultants with cascading supervision as in the traditional consultant-registrar-resident model. As both clinical and teaching capacity develops, the workforce may stabilise, infrastructure and teaching culture are established, and long-term recruitment and retention strategies emerge. Applying these models in other rural and community settings may make it possible to manage the increased training capacity and address workforce needs without compromising the educational experience - indeed, it may be enhanced. SN - 0025-729X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19619098/A_tale_of_three_hospitals:_solving_learning_and_workforce_needs_together_ L2 - https://www.mja.com.au/public/issues/191_02_200709/sen10428_fm.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -