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Race/Ethnicity has no effect on outcome for breast cancer patients treated at an academic center with a public hospital.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2009 Aug; 18(8):2157-61.CE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

African American women have a higher breast cancer mortality rate than Caucasian women. To understand this difference, socioeconomic status (SES) needs to be controlled, which can be achieved by evaluating outcome within a population that is underinsured or low SES. We elected to examine the effect of race/ethnicity on outcome of patients with operable breast cancer by evaluating outcome in a population with low SES and similar access to care.

METHODS

From a prospective breast cancer database created in 1998, we examined outcome for 786 patients with stage 0 to III breast cancer treated up to September 2008. Patients were treated at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in Shreveport and E.A. Conway Hospital and the majority received standard definitive surgery as well as appropriate adjuvant treatment. Primary endpoints were cancer recurrence and death. Statistical analysis performed included Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, log-rank test, Cox proportional hazards model, independent-samples t test, and chi(2) test. P <or= 0.05 was considered statistically significant.

RESULTS

Sixty percent of patients were African American and over two thirds of patients were classified as either free care or Medicaid. The 5-year overall survival (OS) for African American and Caucasian patients was similar (81% and 84%, respectively; P = 0.23). On multivariate analysis, race/ethnicity was not an independent predictor of OS (P = 0.5); OS for the entire cohort was comparable with what was reported in the National Cancer Data Base.

CONCLUSION

In a predominantly indigent population, race/ethnicity had no effect on breast cancer outcome.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Surgery, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in Shreveport, Shreveport, LA 71130, USA. qchu@lsuhsc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19622718

Citation

Chu, Quyen D., et al. "Race/Ethnicity Has No Effect On Outcome for Breast Cancer Patients Treated at an Academic Center With a Public Hospital." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 18, no. 8, 2009, pp. 2157-61.
Chu QD, Smith MH, Williams M, et al. Race/Ethnicity has no effect on outcome for breast cancer patients treated at an academic center with a public hospital. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2009;18(8):2157-61.
Chu, Q. D., Smith, M. H., Williams, M., Panu, L., Johnson, L. W., Shi, R., Li, B. D., & Glass, J. (2009). Race/Ethnicity has no effect on outcome for breast cancer patients treated at an academic center with a public hospital. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 18(8), 2157-61. https://doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-09-0232
Chu QD, et al. Race/Ethnicity Has No Effect On Outcome for Breast Cancer Patients Treated at an Academic Center With a Public Hospital. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2009;18(8):2157-61. PubMed PMID: 19622718.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Race/Ethnicity has no effect on outcome for breast cancer patients treated at an academic center with a public hospital. AU - Chu,Quyen D, AU - Smith,Mark H, AU - Williams,Mallory, AU - Panu,Lori, AU - Johnson,Lester W, AU - Shi,Runhua, AU - Li,Benjamin D L, AU - Glass,Jonathan, Y1 - 2009/07/21/ PY - 2009/7/23/entrez PY - 2009/7/23/pubmed PY - 2009/10/21/medline SP - 2157 EP - 61 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev VL - 18 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: African American women have a higher breast cancer mortality rate than Caucasian women. To understand this difference, socioeconomic status (SES) needs to be controlled, which can be achieved by evaluating outcome within a population that is underinsured or low SES. We elected to examine the effect of race/ethnicity on outcome of patients with operable breast cancer by evaluating outcome in a population with low SES and similar access to care. METHODS: From a prospective breast cancer database created in 1998, we examined outcome for 786 patients with stage 0 to III breast cancer treated up to September 2008. Patients were treated at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in Shreveport and E.A. Conway Hospital and the majority received standard definitive surgery as well as appropriate adjuvant treatment. Primary endpoints were cancer recurrence and death. Statistical analysis performed included Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, log-rank test, Cox proportional hazards model, independent-samples t test, and chi(2) test. P <or= 0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: Sixty percent of patients were African American and over two thirds of patients were classified as either free care or Medicaid. The 5-year overall survival (OS) for African American and Caucasian patients was similar (81% and 84%, respectively; P = 0.23). On multivariate analysis, race/ethnicity was not an independent predictor of OS (P = 0.5); OS for the entire cohort was comparable with what was reported in the National Cancer Data Base. CONCLUSION: In a predominantly indigent population, race/ethnicity had no effect on breast cancer outcome. SN - 1538-7755 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19622718/Race/Ethnicity_has_no_effect_on_outcome_for_breast_cancer_patients_treated_at_an_academic_center_with_a_public_hospital_ L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=19622718 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -