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Green tea and death from pneumonia in Japan: the Ohsaki cohort study.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 Sep; 90(3):672-9.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Experimental and animal studies have shown the activities of catechins, the main constituents of green tea, against infectious agents. No data are available on the association between green tea consumption and the risk of pneumonia in humans.

OBJECTIVE

We examined the association between green tea consumption and death from pneumonia in humans.

DESIGN

We conducted a population-based cohort study, with follow-up from 1995 to 2006. The participants were National Health Insurance beneficiaries in Japan (19,079 men and 21,493 women aged 40-79 y). We excluded participants for whom data on green tea consumption frequency were missing or who had reported a history of cancer, myocardial infarction, stroke, and extreme daily energy intake at baseline. We used Cox proportional hazards regression analysis to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and their 95% CIs for death from pneumonia according to green tea consumption.

RESULTS

Over 12 y of follow-up, we documented 406 deaths from pneumonia. In women, the multivariate HRs of death from pneumonia that were associated with different frequencies of green tea consumption were 1.00 (reference) for <1 cup/d, 0.59 (95% CI: 0.36, 0.98) for 1-2 cups/d, 0.55 (95% CI: 0.33, 0.91) for 3-4 cups/d, and 0.53 (95% CI: 0.33, 0.83) for > or =5 cups/d, respectively (P for trend: 0.008). In men, no significant association was observed.

CONCLUSION

Green tea consumption was associated with a lower risk of death from pneumonia in Japanese women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Public Health and Forensic Medicine, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan. ikue@mail.tains.tohoku.ac.jpNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19625686

Citation

Watanabe, Ikue, et al. "Green Tea and Death From Pneumonia in Japan: the Ohsaki Cohort Study." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 90, no. 3, 2009, pp. 672-9.
Watanabe I, Kuriyama S, Kakizaki M, et al. Green tea and death from pneumonia in Japan: the Ohsaki cohort study. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;90(3):672-9.
Watanabe, I., Kuriyama, S., Kakizaki, M., Sone, T., Ohmori-Matsuda, K., Nakaya, N., Hozawa, A., & Tsuji, I. (2009). Green tea and death from pneumonia in Japan: the Ohsaki cohort study. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 90(3), 672-9. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.2009.27599
Watanabe I, et al. Green Tea and Death From Pneumonia in Japan: the Ohsaki Cohort Study. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;90(3):672-9. PubMed PMID: 19625686.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Green tea and death from pneumonia in Japan: the Ohsaki cohort study. AU - Watanabe,Ikue, AU - Kuriyama,Shinichi, AU - Kakizaki,Masako, AU - Sone,Toshimasa, AU - Ohmori-Matsuda,Kaori, AU - Nakaya,Naoki, AU - Hozawa,Atsushi, AU - Tsuji,Ichiro, Y1 - 2009/07/22/ PY - 2009/7/24/entrez PY - 2009/7/25/pubmed PY - 2009/9/30/medline SP - 672 EP - 9 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 90 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Experimental and animal studies have shown the activities of catechins, the main constituents of green tea, against infectious agents. No data are available on the association between green tea consumption and the risk of pneumonia in humans. OBJECTIVE: We examined the association between green tea consumption and death from pneumonia in humans. DESIGN: We conducted a population-based cohort study, with follow-up from 1995 to 2006. The participants were National Health Insurance beneficiaries in Japan (19,079 men and 21,493 women aged 40-79 y). We excluded participants for whom data on green tea consumption frequency were missing or who had reported a history of cancer, myocardial infarction, stroke, and extreme daily energy intake at baseline. We used Cox proportional hazards regression analysis to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and their 95% CIs for death from pneumonia according to green tea consumption. RESULTS: Over 12 y of follow-up, we documented 406 deaths from pneumonia. In women, the multivariate HRs of death from pneumonia that were associated with different frequencies of green tea consumption were 1.00 (reference) for <1 cup/d, 0.59 (95% CI: 0.36, 0.98) for 1-2 cups/d, 0.55 (95% CI: 0.33, 0.91) for 3-4 cups/d, and 0.53 (95% CI: 0.33, 0.83) for > or =5 cups/d, respectively (P for trend: 0.008). In men, no significant association was observed. CONCLUSION: Green tea consumption was associated with a lower risk of death from pneumonia in Japanese women. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19625686/Green_tea_and_death_from_pneumonia_in_Japan:_the_Ohsaki_cohort_study_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.2009.27599 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -