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Social activity and improvement in depressive symptoms in older people: a prospective community cohort study.
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2009 Aug; 17(8):688-96.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate: i) the association between level of social activity and late-life depressive symptoms and ii) the association between level of social activity and improvement in depressive symptoms over a 2-year period among people scoring above case level.

DESIGN

A secondary analysis of data from a prospective community-based study.

SETTING

Montpellier district, France.

PARTICIPANTS

Community residents aged 65 and older (N = 1,849), 85.4% of whom were reassessed after a 2-year interval.

MEASUREMENTS

Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale at baseline and follow-up, and the standard 16 + cutoff was applied to define case-level symptomatology. The primary independent variable assessed at baseline was three levels of social activity defined from a 33-point scale. Other covariates included age, gender, marital status, education, alcohol consumption, chronic illness, cognitive impairment, disability, life events, and antidepressant use at baseline and follow-up.

RESULTS

In the sample at baseline (N = 1,849), higher social activity was negatively associated with case-level depressive symptomatology after adjustment for potential confounders (odds ratio across three groups 0.7, 95% confidence interval 0.6-0.8). In a prospective analysis of participants above case level at baseline (N = 463), high-social activity at baseline was the only variable associated with improvement in depressive symptoms and remained significant after adjustment for all other factors (odds ratio=1.6; 95% confidence interval = 1.2-2.2).

CONCLUSIONS

In a large community sample, higher social activity was associated with a lower risk of late-life depressive symptoms at baseline and, in those with case-level baseline symptoms, was the principal factor predicting improvement over 2-year follow-up.

Authors+Show Affiliations

King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Section of Epidemiology, London, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19625786

Citation

Isaac, Vivian, et al. "Social Activity and Improvement in Depressive Symptoms in Older People: a Prospective Community Cohort Study." The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry : Official Journal of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry, vol. 17, no. 8, 2009, pp. 688-96.
Isaac V, Stewart R, Artero S, et al. Social activity and improvement in depressive symptoms in older people: a prospective community cohort study. Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2009;17(8):688-96.
Isaac, V., Stewart, R., Artero, S., Ancelin, M. L., & Ritchie, K. (2009). Social activity and improvement in depressive symptoms in older people: a prospective community cohort study. The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry : Official Journal of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry, 17(8), 688-96. https://doi.org/10.1097/JGP.0b013e3181a88441
Isaac V, et al. Social Activity and Improvement in Depressive Symptoms in Older People: a Prospective Community Cohort Study. Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2009;17(8):688-96. PubMed PMID: 19625786.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Social activity and improvement in depressive symptoms in older people: a prospective community cohort study. AU - Isaac,Vivian, AU - Stewart,Robert, AU - Artero,Sylvaine, AU - Ancelin,Marie-Laure, AU - Ritchie,Karen, PY - 2009/7/24/entrez PY - 2009/7/25/pubmed PY - 2009/10/1/medline SP - 688 EP - 96 JF - The American journal of geriatric psychiatry : official journal of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry JO - Am J Geriatr Psychiatry VL - 17 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate: i) the association between level of social activity and late-life depressive symptoms and ii) the association between level of social activity and improvement in depressive symptoms over a 2-year period among people scoring above case level. DESIGN: A secondary analysis of data from a prospective community-based study. SETTING: Montpellier district, France. PARTICIPANTS: Community residents aged 65 and older (N = 1,849), 85.4% of whom were reassessed after a 2-year interval. MEASUREMENTS: Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale at baseline and follow-up, and the standard 16 + cutoff was applied to define case-level symptomatology. The primary independent variable assessed at baseline was three levels of social activity defined from a 33-point scale. Other covariates included age, gender, marital status, education, alcohol consumption, chronic illness, cognitive impairment, disability, life events, and antidepressant use at baseline and follow-up. RESULTS: In the sample at baseline (N = 1,849), higher social activity was negatively associated with case-level depressive symptomatology after adjustment for potential confounders (odds ratio across three groups 0.7, 95% confidence interval 0.6-0.8). In a prospective analysis of participants above case level at baseline (N = 463), high-social activity at baseline was the only variable associated with improvement in depressive symptoms and remained significant after adjustment for all other factors (odds ratio=1.6; 95% confidence interval = 1.2-2.2). CONCLUSIONS: In a large community sample, higher social activity was associated with a lower risk of late-life depressive symptoms at baseline and, in those with case-level baseline symptoms, was the principal factor predicting improvement over 2-year follow-up. SN - 1545-7214 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19625786/Social_activity_and_improvement_in_depressive_symptoms_in_older_people:_a_prospective_community_cohort_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/00019442-200908000-00009 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -