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Phosphorus and potassium content of enhanced meat and poultry products: implications for patients who receive dialysis.
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2009 Aug; 4(8):1370-3.CJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES

Uncooked meat and poultry products are commonly enhanced by food processors using phosphate salts. The addition of potassium and phosphorus to these foods has been recognized but not quantified.

DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS

We measured the phosphorus, potassium, and protein content of 36 uncooked meat and poultry products: Phosphorus using the Association of Analytical Communities (AOAC) official method 984.27, potassium using AOAC official method 985.01, and protein using AOAC official method 990.03.

RESULTS

Products that reported the use of additives had an average phosphate-protein ratio 28% higher than additive free products; the content ranged up to almost 100% higher. Potassium content in foods with additives varied widely; additive free products all contained <387 mg/100 g, whereas five of the 25 products with additives contained at least 692 mg/100 g (maximum 930 mg/100 g). Most but not all foods with phosphate and potassium additives reported the additives (unquantified) on the labeling; eight of 25 enhanced products did not list the additives. The results cannot be applied to other products. The composition of the food additives used by food processors may change over time.

CONCLUSIONS

Uncooked meat and poultry products that are enhanced may contain additives that increase phosphorus and potassium content by as much as almost two- and three-fold, respectively; this modification may not be discernible from inspection of the food label.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Place, P.O. Box 19, New Brunswick, NJ 08903, USA. sherman@umdnj.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19628683

Citation

Sherman, Richard A., and Ojas Mehta. "Phosphorus and Potassium Content of Enhanced Meat and Poultry Products: Implications for Patients Who Receive Dialysis." Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : CJASN, vol. 4, no. 8, 2009, pp. 1370-3.
Sherman RA, Mehta O. Phosphorus and potassium content of enhanced meat and poultry products: implications for patients who receive dialysis. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2009;4(8):1370-3.
Sherman, R. A., & Mehta, O. (2009). Phosphorus and potassium content of enhanced meat and poultry products: implications for patients who receive dialysis. Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : CJASN, 4(8), 1370-3. https://doi.org/10.2215/CJN.02830409
Sherman RA, Mehta O. Phosphorus and Potassium Content of Enhanced Meat and Poultry Products: Implications for Patients Who Receive Dialysis. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2009;4(8):1370-3. PubMed PMID: 19628683.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Phosphorus and potassium content of enhanced meat and poultry products: implications for patients who receive dialysis. AU - Sherman,Richard A, AU - Mehta,Ojas, Y1 - 2009/07/23/ PY - 2009/7/25/entrez PY - 2009/7/25/pubmed PY - 2009/10/16/medline SP - 1370 EP - 3 JF - Clinical journal of the American Society of Nephrology : CJASN JO - Clin J Am Soc Nephrol VL - 4 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Uncooked meat and poultry products are commonly enhanced by food processors using phosphate salts. The addition of potassium and phosphorus to these foods has been recognized but not quantified. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS: We measured the phosphorus, potassium, and protein content of 36 uncooked meat and poultry products: Phosphorus using the Association of Analytical Communities (AOAC) official method 984.27, potassium using AOAC official method 985.01, and protein using AOAC official method 990.03. RESULTS: Products that reported the use of additives had an average phosphate-protein ratio 28% higher than additive free products; the content ranged up to almost 100% higher. Potassium content in foods with additives varied widely; additive free products all contained <387 mg/100 g, whereas five of the 25 products with additives contained at least 692 mg/100 g (maximum 930 mg/100 g). Most but not all foods with phosphate and potassium additives reported the additives (unquantified) on the labeling; eight of 25 enhanced products did not list the additives. The results cannot be applied to other products. The composition of the food additives used by food processors may change over time. CONCLUSIONS: Uncooked meat and poultry products that are enhanced may contain additives that increase phosphorus and potassium content by as much as almost two- and three-fold, respectively; this modification may not be discernible from inspection of the food label. SN - 1555-905X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19628683/Phosphorus_and_potassium_content_of_enhanced_meat_and_poultry_products:_implications_for_patients_who_receive_dialysis_ L2 - https://cjasn.asnjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=19628683 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -