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Paediatric conscious sedation: views and experience of specialists in paediatric dentistry.
Br Dent J. 2009 Sep 26; 207(6):E11; discussion 280-1.BD

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

The objectives were three-fold: to investigate the level of conscious sedation training received prior to and during specialist training in paediatric dentistry; to establish the use of conscious sedation during and following specialisation; and to determine the attitudes of specialists in paediatric dentistry to conscious sedation.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS

A self-administered postal questionnaire was sent to all specialists in paediatric dentistry registered with the General Dental Council in January 2008. Non-responders were contacted again after a four-week period.

RESULTS

A response rate of 60% was achieved. Of the 122 respondents, 67 (55%) had received sedation training as an undergraduate; 89 (75%) had been trained during specialisation. All respondents performed dental treatment under sedation as a trainee and the majority used nitrous oxide inhalation sedation (NOIS). Over 90% of respondents felt that NOIS should be available to all children, both in appropriate primary care settings and in hospitals. One hundred and twenty-one (99%) respondents thought that all trainees in paediatric dentistry should have sedation training.

CONCLUSIONS

The most popular form of sedation amongst specialists in paediatric dentistry was NOIS. However, some of the respondents felt that children should have access to other forms of sedation in both the primary care and hospital settings. Additional research on other forms of sedation is required to evaluate their effectiveness and safety.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Cardiff University School of Dentistry, Heath Park, Cardiff, CF14 4XY. woolleysm@cardiff.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19629146

Citation

Woolley, S M., et al. "Paediatric Conscious Sedation: Views and Experience of Specialists in Paediatric Dentistry." British Dental Journal, vol. 207, no. 6, 2009, pp. E11; discussion 280-1.
Woolley SM, Hingston EJ, Shah J, et al. Paediatric conscious sedation: views and experience of specialists in paediatric dentistry. Br Dent J. 2009;207(6):E11; discussion 280-1.
Woolley, S. M., Hingston, E. J., Shah, J., & Chadwick, B. L. (2009). Paediatric conscious sedation: views and experience of specialists in paediatric dentistry. British Dental Journal, 207(6), E11; discussion 280-1. https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.bdj.2009.664
Woolley SM, et al. Paediatric Conscious Sedation: Views and Experience of Specialists in Paediatric Dentistry. Br Dent J. 2009 Sep 26;207(6):E11; discussion 280-1. PubMed PMID: 19629146.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Paediatric conscious sedation: views and experience of specialists in paediatric dentistry. AU - Woolley,S M, AU - Hingston,E J, AU - Shah,J, AU - Chadwick,B L, Y1 - 2009/07/24/ PY - 2008/12/19/accepted PY - 2009/7/25/entrez PY - 2009/7/25/pubmed PY - 2009/12/23/medline SP - E11; discussion 280-1 JF - British dental journal JO - Br Dent J VL - 207 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVES: The objectives were three-fold: to investigate the level of conscious sedation training received prior to and during specialist training in paediatric dentistry; to establish the use of conscious sedation during and following specialisation; and to determine the attitudes of specialists in paediatric dentistry to conscious sedation. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A self-administered postal questionnaire was sent to all specialists in paediatric dentistry registered with the General Dental Council in January 2008. Non-responders were contacted again after a four-week period. RESULTS: A response rate of 60% was achieved. Of the 122 respondents, 67 (55%) had received sedation training as an undergraduate; 89 (75%) had been trained during specialisation. All respondents performed dental treatment under sedation as a trainee and the majority used nitrous oxide inhalation sedation (NOIS). Over 90% of respondents felt that NOIS should be available to all children, both in appropriate primary care settings and in hospitals. One hundred and twenty-one (99%) respondents thought that all trainees in paediatric dentistry should have sedation training. CONCLUSIONS: The most popular form of sedation amongst specialists in paediatric dentistry was NOIS. However, some of the respondents felt that children should have access to other forms of sedation in both the primary care and hospital settings. Additional research on other forms of sedation is required to evaluate their effectiveness and safety. SN - 1476-5373 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19629146/Paediatric_conscious_sedation:_views_and_experience_of_specialists_in_paediatric_dentistry_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.bdj.2009.664 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -