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MRI and CSF biomarkers in normal, MCI, and AD subjects: diagnostic discrimination and cognitive correlations.
Neurology. 2009 Jul 28; 73(4):287-93.Neur

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the correlations of both MRI and CSF biomarkers with clinical diagnosis and with cognitive performance in cognitively normal (CN) subjects and patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and Alzheimer disease (AD).

METHODS

This is a cross-sectional study with data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, which consists of CN subjects, subjects with aMCI, and subjects with AD with both CSF and MRI. Baseline CSF (t-tau, Abeta(1-42), and p-tau(181P)) and MRI scans were obtained in 399 subjects (109 CN, 192 aMCI, 98 AD). Structural Abnormality Index (STAND) scores, which reflect the degree of AD-like anatomic features on MRI, were computed for each subject.

RESULTS

We found no significant correlation between CSF biomarkers and cognitive scores in any of the 3 clinical groups individually. Conversely, STAND scores correlated with both Clinical Dementia Rating-sum of boxes and Mini-Mental State Examination in aMCI and AD (p < or = 0.01). While STAND and all CSF biomarkers were predictors of clinical group membership (CN, aMCI, or AD) univariately (p < 0.001), STAND was more predictive than CSF both univariately and in combined models.

CONCLUSIONS

CSF and MRI biomarkers independently contribute to intergroup diagnostic discrimination and the combination of CSF and MRI provides better prediction than either source of data alone. However, MRI provides greater power to effect cross-sectional groupwise discrimination and better correlation with general cognition and functional status cross-sectionally. We therefore conclude that although MRI and CSF provide complementary information, MRI reflects clinically defined disease stage better than the CSF biomarkers tested.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Aging and Dementia Imaging Research Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19636048

Citation

Vemuri, P, et al. "MRI and CSF Biomarkers in Normal, MCI, and AD Subjects: Diagnostic Discrimination and Cognitive Correlations." Neurology, vol. 73, no. 4, 2009, pp. 287-93.
Vemuri P, Wiste HJ, Weigand SD, et al. MRI and CSF biomarkers in normal, MCI, and AD subjects: diagnostic discrimination and cognitive correlations. Neurology. 2009;73(4):287-93.
Vemuri, P., Wiste, H. J., Weigand, S. D., Shaw, L. M., Trojanowski, J. Q., Weiner, M. W., Knopman, D. S., Petersen, R. C., & Jack, C. R. (2009). MRI and CSF biomarkers in normal, MCI, and AD subjects: diagnostic discrimination and cognitive correlations. Neurology, 73(4), 287-93. https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0b013e3181af79e5
Vemuri P, et al. MRI and CSF Biomarkers in Normal, MCI, and AD Subjects: Diagnostic Discrimination and Cognitive Correlations. Neurology. 2009 Jul 28;73(4):287-93. PubMed PMID: 19636048.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - MRI and CSF biomarkers in normal, MCI, and AD subjects: diagnostic discrimination and cognitive correlations. AU - Vemuri,P, AU - Wiste,H J, AU - Weigand,S D, AU - Shaw,L M, AU - Trojanowski,J Q, AU - Weiner,M W, AU - Knopman,D S, AU - Petersen,R C, AU - Jack,C R,Jr AU - ,, PY - 2009/7/29/entrez PY - 2009/7/29/pubmed PY - 2009/9/10/medline SP - 287 EP - 93 JF - Neurology JO - Neurology VL - 73 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To assess the correlations of both MRI and CSF biomarkers with clinical diagnosis and with cognitive performance in cognitively normal (CN) subjects and patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and Alzheimer disease (AD). METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study with data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, which consists of CN subjects, subjects with aMCI, and subjects with AD with both CSF and MRI. Baseline CSF (t-tau, Abeta(1-42), and p-tau(181P)) and MRI scans were obtained in 399 subjects (109 CN, 192 aMCI, 98 AD). Structural Abnormality Index (STAND) scores, which reflect the degree of AD-like anatomic features on MRI, were computed for each subject. RESULTS: We found no significant correlation between CSF biomarkers and cognitive scores in any of the 3 clinical groups individually. Conversely, STAND scores correlated with both Clinical Dementia Rating-sum of boxes and Mini-Mental State Examination in aMCI and AD (p < or = 0.01). While STAND and all CSF biomarkers were predictors of clinical group membership (CN, aMCI, or AD) univariately (p < 0.001), STAND was more predictive than CSF both univariately and in combined models. CONCLUSIONS: CSF and MRI biomarkers independently contribute to intergroup diagnostic discrimination and the combination of CSF and MRI provides better prediction than either source of data alone. However, MRI provides greater power to effect cross-sectional groupwise discrimination and better correlation with general cognition and functional status cross-sectionally. We therefore conclude that although MRI and CSF provide complementary information, MRI reflects clinically defined disease stage better than the CSF biomarkers tested. SN - 1526-632X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19636048/MRI_and_CSF_biomarkers_in_normal_MCI_and_AD_subjects:_diagnostic_discrimination_and_cognitive_correlations_ L2 - http://www.neurology.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=19636048 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -