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Increased cortical nitric oxide release after phencyclidine administration.
Synapse. 2009 Dec; 63(12):1083-8.S

Abstract

Phencyclidine exerts psychotomimetic effects in humans and is used as a pharmacological animal model for schizophrenia. We, and others, have demonstrated that phencyclidine induces cognitive deficits in rats that are associated with schizophrenia. These cognitive deficits can be normalized by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase. The development of selective microelectrochemical nitric oxide sensors may provide direct evidence for the involvement of nitric oxide in these effects. The aim of the present study was to use LIVE (long term in vivo electrochemistry) to investigate the effect of phencyclidine, alone or in combination with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME, on nitric oxide levels in the medial prefrontal cortex of freely moving rats. Phencyclidine (2 mg kg(-1)) produced an increase in cortical nitric oxide levels and this increase was ameliorated by L-NAME (10 mg kg(-1)). Tentatively, the results from the present study provide a biochemical rationale for the involvement of nitric oxide in the phencyclidine model of schizophrenia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden. erik.palsson@pharm.gu.seNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19642219

Citation

Pålsson, Erik, et al. "Increased Cortical Nitric Oxide Release After Phencyclidine Administration." Synapse (New York, N.Y.), vol. 63, no. 12, 2009, pp. 1083-8.
Pålsson E, Finnerty N, Fejgin K, et al. Increased cortical nitric oxide release after phencyclidine administration. Synapse. 2009;63(12):1083-8.
Pålsson, E., Finnerty, N., Fejgin, K., Klamer, D., Wass, C., Svensson, L., & Lowry, J. (2009). Increased cortical nitric oxide release after phencyclidine administration. Synapse (New York, N.Y.), 63(12), 1083-8. https://doi.org/10.1002/syn.20690
Pålsson E, et al. Increased Cortical Nitric Oxide Release After Phencyclidine Administration. Synapse. 2009;63(12):1083-8. PubMed PMID: 19642219.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Increased cortical nitric oxide release after phencyclidine administration. AU - Pålsson,Erik, AU - Finnerty,Niall, AU - Fejgin,Kim, AU - Klamer,Daniel, AU - Wass,Caroline, AU - Svensson,Lennart, AU - Lowry,John, PY - 2009/7/31/entrez PY - 2009/7/31/pubmed PY - 2010/2/18/medline SP - 1083 EP - 8 JF - Synapse (New York, N.Y.) JO - Synapse VL - 63 IS - 12 N2 - Phencyclidine exerts psychotomimetic effects in humans and is used as a pharmacological animal model for schizophrenia. We, and others, have demonstrated that phencyclidine induces cognitive deficits in rats that are associated with schizophrenia. These cognitive deficits can be normalized by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase. The development of selective microelectrochemical nitric oxide sensors may provide direct evidence for the involvement of nitric oxide in these effects. The aim of the present study was to use LIVE (long term in vivo electrochemistry) to investigate the effect of phencyclidine, alone or in combination with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME, on nitric oxide levels in the medial prefrontal cortex of freely moving rats. Phencyclidine (2 mg kg(-1)) produced an increase in cortical nitric oxide levels and this increase was ameliorated by L-NAME (10 mg kg(-1)). Tentatively, the results from the present study provide a biochemical rationale for the involvement of nitric oxide in the phencyclidine model of schizophrenia. SN - 1098-2396 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19642219/Increased_cortical_nitric_oxide_release_after_phencyclidine_administration_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/syn.20690 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -