Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

A stepped intervention increases well-child care and immunization rates in a disadvantaged population.
Pediatrics. 2009 Aug; 124(2):455-64.Ped

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To test a stepped intervention of reminder/recall/case management to increase infant well-child visits and immunization rates.

METHODS

We conducted a randomized, controlled, practical, clinical trial with 811 infants born in an urban safety-net hospital and followed through 15 months of life. Step 1 (all infants) involved language-appropriate reminder postcards for every well-child visit. Step 2 (infants who missed an appointment or immunization) involved telephone reminders plus postcard and telephone recall. Step 3 (infants still behind on preventive care after steps 1 and 2) involved intensive case management and home visitation.

RESULTS

Infants in the intervention arm, compared with control infants, had significantly fewer days without immunization coverage in the first 15 months of life (109 vs 192 days P < .01) and were more likely to have >or=5 well-child visits (65% vs 47% P < .01). In multivariate analyses, infants in the intervention arm were more likely than control infants to be up to date with 12-month immunizations and to have had >or=5 well-child visits. The cost per child was $23.30 per month.

CONCLUSION

This stepped intervention of tracking and case management improved infant immunization status and receipt of preventive care in a population of high-risk urban infants of low socioeconomic status.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Denver Community Health Services, Denver Health, Denver,Colorado , USA 80204. simon.hambidge@dhha.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19651574

Citation

Hambidge, Simon J., et al. "A Stepped Intervention Increases Well-child Care and Immunization Rates in a Disadvantaged Population." Pediatrics, vol. 124, no. 2, 2009, pp. 455-64.
Hambidge SJ, Phibbs SL, Chandramouli V, et al. A stepped intervention increases well-child care and immunization rates in a disadvantaged population. Pediatrics. 2009;124(2):455-64.
Hambidge, S. J., Phibbs, S. L., Chandramouli, V., Fairclough, D., & Steiner, J. F. (2009). A stepped intervention increases well-child care and immunization rates in a disadvantaged population. Pediatrics, 124(2), 455-64. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2008-0446
Hambidge SJ, et al. A Stepped Intervention Increases Well-child Care and Immunization Rates in a Disadvantaged Population. Pediatrics. 2009;124(2):455-64. PubMed PMID: 19651574.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A stepped intervention increases well-child care and immunization rates in a disadvantaged population. AU - Hambidge,Simon J, AU - Phibbs,Stephanie L, AU - Chandramouli,Vijayalaxmi, AU - Fairclough,Diane, AU - Steiner,John F, Y1 - 2009/07/27/ PY - 2009/8/5/entrez PY - 2009/8/5/pubmed PY - 2009/8/14/medline SP - 455 EP - 64 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 124 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To test a stepped intervention of reminder/recall/case management to increase infant well-child visits and immunization rates. METHODS: We conducted a randomized, controlled, practical, clinical trial with 811 infants born in an urban safety-net hospital and followed through 15 months of life. Step 1 (all infants) involved language-appropriate reminder postcards for every well-child visit. Step 2 (infants who missed an appointment or immunization) involved telephone reminders plus postcard and telephone recall. Step 3 (infants still behind on preventive care after steps 1 and 2) involved intensive case management and home visitation. RESULTS: Infants in the intervention arm, compared with control infants, had significantly fewer days without immunization coverage in the first 15 months of life (109 vs 192 days P < .01) and were more likely to have >or=5 well-child visits (65% vs 47% P < .01). In multivariate analyses, infants in the intervention arm were more likely than control infants to be up to date with 12-month immunizations and to have had >or=5 well-child visits. The cost per child was $23.30 per month. CONCLUSION: This stepped intervention of tracking and case management improved infant immunization status and receipt of preventive care in a population of high-risk urban infants of low socioeconomic status. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19651574/A_stepped_intervention_increases_well_child_care_and_immunization_rates_in_a_disadvantaged_population_ L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=19651574 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -