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Efficacy of arm-ergometry versus treadmill exercise training to improve walking distance in patients with claudication.
Vasc Med. 2009 Aug; 14(3):203-13.VM

Abstract

The efficacy of treadmill walking training to improve pain-free (PFWD) and maximal (MWD) walking distance in patients with claudication is well documented. The effects of aerobic arm-ergometry to improve PFWD and MWD compared to treadmill walking or usual care are not known. Forty-one participants (29 male, 12 female, mean age 67.7 years, 92.7% smoking history, 36.6% with diabetes) with lifestyle-limiting claudication were randomized to 12 weeks of 3 hours/week of supervised exercise training using either arm-ergometry, treadmill walking, or a combination, versus control. PFWD and MWD were assessed before and after training, and after 12 weeks of follow-up. The 12-week MWD increased significantly in the arm-ergometry (+53%), treadmill (+69%), and combination (+68%) groups (p < 0.002 versus control). The 24-week MWD was maintained in the arm-ergometry (p = 0.009) and treadmill (p = 0.019) groups, whereas the combination group declined (p = 0.751) versus control. The 12-week PFWD increased significantly in the arm-ergometry group (+82%; p = 0.025 versus control). Change in PFWD in treadmill (+54%; p = 0.196 versus control) and combination (+60%; p = 0.107 versus control) groups did not reach statistical significance. PFWD improvement was maintained in the arm-ergometry group after a 12-week follow-up (+123%; p = 0.011 versus control). In conclusion, these pilot data demonstrate for the first time that dynamic arm exercise training can improve walking capability in people with peripheral arterial disease (PAD)-induced claudication compared to participants receiving usual care and that improvement was not different from that seen with treadmill walking exercise training. Dynamic arm exercise may be a therapeutic exercise option for patients with PAD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Minnesota School of Nursing, Center for Gerontological Nursing, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA. treat001@umn.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19651669

Citation

Treat-Jacobson, Diane, et al. "Efficacy of Arm-ergometry Versus Treadmill Exercise Training to Improve Walking Distance in Patients With Claudication." Vascular Medicine (London, England), vol. 14, no. 3, 2009, pp. 203-13.
Treat-Jacobson D, Bronas UG, Leon AS. Efficacy of arm-ergometry versus treadmill exercise training to improve walking distance in patients with claudication. Vasc Med. 2009;14(3):203-13.
Treat-Jacobson, D., Bronas, U. G., & Leon, A. S. (2009). Efficacy of arm-ergometry versus treadmill exercise training to improve walking distance in patients with claudication. Vascular Medicine (London, England), 14(3), 203-13. https://doi.org/10.1177/1358863X08101858
Treat-Jacobson D, Bronas UG, Leon AS. Efficacy of Arm-ergometry Versus Treadmill Exercise Training to Improve Walking Distance in Patients With Claudication. Vasc Med. 2009;14(3):203-13. PubMed PMID: 19651669.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Efficacy of arm-ergometry versus treadmill exercise training to improve walking distance in patients with claudication. AU - Treat-Jacobson,Diane, AU - Bronas,Ulf G, AU - Leon,Arthur S, PY - 2009/8/5/entrez PY - 2009/8/5/pubmed PY - 2009/10/9/medline SP - 203 EP - 13 JF - Vascular medicine (London, England) JO - Vasc Med VL - 14 IS - 3 N2 - The efficacy of treadmill walking training to improve pain-free (PFWD) and maximal (MWD) walking distance in patients with claudication is well documented. The effects of aerobic arm-ergometry to improve PFWD and MWD compared to treadmill walking or usual care are not known. Forty-one participants (29 male, 12 female, mean age 67.7 years, 92.7% smoking history, 36.6% with diabetes) with lifestyle-limiting claudication were randomized to 12 weeks of 3 hours/week of supervised exercise training using either arm-ergometry, treadmill walking, or a combination, versus control. PFWD and MWD were assessed before and after training, and after 12 weeks of follow-up. The 12-week MWD increased significantly in the arm-ergometry (+53%), treadmill (+69%), and combination (+68%) groups (p < 0.002 versus control). The 24-week MWD was maintained in the arm-ergometry (p = 0.009) and treadmill (p = 0.019) groups, whereas the combination group declined (p = 0.751) versus control. The 12-week PFWD increased significantly in the arm-ergometry group (+82%; p = 0.025 versus control). Change in PFWD in treadmill (+54%; p = 0.196 versus control) and combination (+60%; p = 0.107 versus control) groups did not reach statistical significance. PFWD improvement was maintained in the arm-ergometry group after a 12-week follow-up (+123%; p = 0.011 versus control). In conclusion, these pilot data demonstrate for the first time that dynamic arm exercise training can improve walking capability in people with peripheral arterial disease (PAD)-induced claudication compared to participants receiving usual care and that improvement was not different from that seen with treadmill walking exercise training. Dynamic arm exercise may be a therapeutic exercise option for patients with PAD. SN - 1358-863X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19651669/Efficacy_of_arm_ergometry_versus_treadmill_exercise_training_to_improve_walking_distance_in_patients_with_claudication_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1358863X08101858?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -