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Intention to obtain human papillomavirus vaccination among taiwanese undergraduate women.
Sex Transm Dis. 2009 Nov; 36(11):686-92.ST

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine provides an effective strategy against HPV infection, genital warts, and cervical cancer. While the HPV vaccine is available worldwide, acceptance outside of Western countries is unknown. The purpose of the study was to examine health beliefs and intention to obtain the HPV vaccination among undergraduate women in Taiwan. A predictive model of HPV vaccination intention was investigated.

METHODS

A convenience sample of 845 female undergraduate students (mean age = 20 years, aged: 17-36 years) recruited from 5 universities located in South Taiwan, provided data. A self-administered questionnaire requested demographic information, gynecologic history, awareness of HPV and the vaccine, health beliefs, and intention to obtain the HPV vaccine.

RESULTS

Over 50% of the undergraduate women were aware of HPV and the HPV vaccine. Sixty-three percent of the students reported a high intention to obtain the HPV vaccine. Demographic factors predicting HPV vaccination included: age, family history of gynecologic cancer, personal history of gynecological visit, sexual experience, and awareness of HPV and the HPV vaccine. Health belief factors predicting HPV vaccination included: personal susceptibility of disease, perception of disease severity, attributes of HPV, cost and availability of vaccine, attributes of HPV, and recommendations from others.

CONCLUSIONS

Improving undergraduate women's HPV vaccination rate will require educational campaigns, specifically focused on the efficacy, safety, and benefits of the HPV vaccine and the attributes of HPV infection. Targeting incoming students who are not yet sexually active could achieve successful outcomes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nursing, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan, Republic of China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19652629

Citation

Hsu, Yu-Yun, et al. "Intention to Obtain Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Among Taiwanese Undergraduate Women." Sexually Transmitted Diseases, vol. 36, no. 11, 2009, pp. 686-92.
Hsu YY, Fetzer SJ, Hsu KF, et al. Intention to obtain human papillomavirus vaccination among taiwanese undergraduate women. Sex Transm Dis. 2009;36(11):686-92.
Hsu, Y. Y., Fetzer, S. J., Hsu, K. F., Chang, Y. Y., Huang, C. P., & Chou, C. Y. (2009). Intention to obtain human papillomavirus vaccination among taiwanese undergraduate women. Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 36(11), 686-92. https://doi.org/10.1097/OLQ.0b013e3181ad28d3
Hsu YY, et al. Intention to Obtain Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Among Taiwanese Undergraduate Women. Sex Transm Dis. 2009;36(11):686-92. PubMed PMID: 19652629.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intention to obtain human papillomavirus vaccination among taiwanese undergraduate women. AU - Hsu,Yu-Yun, AU - Fetzer,Susan Jane, AU - Hsu,Keng-Fu, AU - Chang,Yuan-Yuan, AU - Huang,Chih-Pyng, AU - Chou,Cheng-Yang, PY - 2009/8/5/entrez PY - 2009/8/5/pubmed PY - 2010/1/23/medline SP - 686 EP - 92 JF - Sexually transmitted diseases JO - Sex Transm Dis VL - 36 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine provides an effective strategy against HPV infection, genital warts, and cervical cancer. While the HPV vaccine is available worldwide, acceptance outside of Western countries is unknown. The purpose of the study was to examine health beliefs and intention to obtain the HPV vaccination among undergraduate women in Taiwan. A predictive model of HPV vaccination intention was investigated. METHODS: A convenience sample of 845 female undergraduate students (mean age = 20 years, aged: 17-36 years) recruited from 5 universities located in South Taiwan, provided data. A self-administered questionnaire requested demographic information, gynecologic history, awareness of HPV and the vaccine, health beliefs, and intention to obtain the HPV vaccine. RESULTS: Over 50% of the undergraduate women were aware of HPV and the HPV vaccine. Sixty-three percent of the students reported a high intention to obtain the HPV vaccine. Demographic factors predicting HPV vaccination included: age, family history of gynecologic cancer, personal history of gynecological visit, sexual experience, and awareness of HPV and the HPV vaccine. Health belief factors predicting HPV vaccination included: personal susceptibility of disease, perception of disease severity, attributes of HPV, cost and availability of vaccine, attributes of HPV, and recommendations from others. CONCLUSIONS: Improving undergraduate women's HPV vaccination rate will require educational campaigns, specifically focused on the efficacy, safety, and benefits of the HPV vaccine and the attributes of HPV infection. Targeting incoming students who are not yet sexually active could achieve successful outcomes. SN - 1537-4521 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19652629/Intention_to_obtain_human_papillomavirus_vaccination_among_taiwanese_undergraduate_women_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/OLQ.0b013e3181ad28d3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -