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Preoperative C-reactive protein levels to predict early and late mortalities after coronary artery bypass surgery: eight years of follow-up.
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2009 Oct; 138(4):954-8.JT

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

There is limited evidence that increased preoperative levels of C-reactive protein are associated with increased mortality after coronary artery bypass grafting. We retrospectively investigated in 5669 patients the predictive value of preoperative C-reactive protein levels for early and late mortalities after coronary artery bypass grafting.

METHODS

Patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass grafting between January 2000 and December 2007 (n = 8500) were studied. Preoperative demographic data and risk factors and outcome data (mortality data) were prospectively collected in a database. Preoperative C-reactive protein levels were retrieved from the laboratory data.

RESULTS

In 5669 of 8500 cases, the preoperative C-reactive protein level could be retrieved. Seventy-five patients were unavailable for follow-up. A preoperative C-reactive protein level greater than 10 mg/L was an independent risk factor for early mortality, whereas a level greater than 5 mg/L was a risk factor for late mortality. Other risk factors were age, sex, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, left ventricular ejection fraction less than 35%, peripheral vascular disease, and previous cardiac surgery. We found a higher mean C-reactive protein value in patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction less than 35% (18.5 +/- 33 mg/L) than in those with an ejection fraction greater than 35% (P < .0001).

CONCLUSIONS

Preoperative C-reactive protein levels can be used in risk stratification in coronary artery bypass grafting surgery. A C-reactive protein level greater than 10 mg/L is a risk factor for early mortality, whereas a level greater than 5 mg/L is a risk factor for late mortality.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, Catharina Hospital-Brabant Medical School, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19660390

Citation

van Straten, Albert H M., et al. "Preoperative C-reactive Protein Levels to Predict Early and Late Mortalities After Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery: Eight Years of Follow-up." The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, vol. 138, no. 4, 2009, pp. 954-8.
van Straten AH, Soliman Hamad MA, van Zundert AJ, et al. Preoperative C-reactive protein levels to predict early and late mortalities after coronary artery bypass surgery: eight years of follow-up. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2009;138(4):954-8.
van Straten, A. H., Soliman Hamad, M. A., van Zundert, A. J., Martens, E. J., Schönberger, J. P., & de Wolf, A. M. (2009). Preoperative C-reactive protein levels to predict early and late mortalities after coronary artery bypass surgery: eight years of follow-up. The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, 138(4), 954-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jtcvs.2009.03.050
van Straten AH, et al. Preoperative C-reactive Protein Levels to Predict Early and Late Mortalities After Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery: Eight Years of Follow-up. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2009;138(4):954-8. PubMed PMID: 19660390.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Preoperative C-reactive protein levels to predict early and late mortalities after coronary artery bypass surgery: eight years of follow-up. AU - van Straten,Albert H M, AU - Soliman Hamad,Mohamed A, AU - van Zundert,André J, AU - Martens,Elisabeth J, AU - Schönberger,Jacques P A M, AU - de Wolf,Andre M, Y1 - 2009/06/23/ PY - 2008/12/10/received PY - 2009/03/23/revised PY - 2009/03/29/accepted PY - 2009/8/8/entrez PY - 2009/8/8/pubmed PY - 2009/10/29/medline SP - 954 EP - 8 JF - The Journal of thoracic and cardiovascular surgery JO - J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg VL - 138 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: There is limited evidence that increased preoperative levels of C-reactive protein are associated with increased mortality after coronary artery bypass grafting. We retrospectively investigated in 5669 patients the predictive value of preoperative C-reactive protein levels for early and late mortalities after coronary artery bypass grafting. METHODS: Patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass grafting between January 2000 and December 2007 (n = 8500) were studied. Preoperative demographic data and risk factors and outcome data (mortality data) were prospectively collected in a database. Preoperative C-reactive protein levels were retrieved from the laboratory data. RESULTS: In 5669 of 8500 cases, the preoperative C-reactive protein level could be retrieved. Seventy-five patients were unavailable for follow-up. A preoperative C-reactive protein level greater than 10 mg/L was an independent risk factor for early mortality, whereas a level greater than 5 mg/L was a risk factor for late mortality. Other risk factors were age, sex, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, left ventricular ejection fraction less than 35%, peripheral vascular disease, and previous cardiac surgery. We found a higher mean C-reactive protein value in patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction less than 35% (18.5 +/- 33 mg/L) than in those with an ejection fraction greater than 35% (P < .0001). CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative C-reactive protein levels can be used in risk stratification in coronary artery bypass grafting surgery. A C-reactive protein level greater than 10 mg/L is a risk factor for early mortality, whereas a level greater than 5 mg/L is a risk factor for late mortality. SN - 1097-685X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19660390/Preoperative_C_reactive_protein_levels_to_predict_early_and_late_mortalities_after_coronary_artery_bypass_surgery:_eight_years_of_follow_up_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-5223(09)00516-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -