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Protocol for managing acute cancrum oris in children: an experience in five cases.
Afr J Paediatr Surg. 2009 Jul-Dec; 6(2):77-81.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Acute cancrum oris (NOMA) is a major health concern in most parts of northern Nigeria, affecting children aged 2-9 years. The management of the acute phase/condition poses a great clinical challenge. We present our protocol for the management of acute NOMA in a referral health facility in northern Nigeria.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

The management of five consecutive children with acute NOMA managed at the maxillo-facial department of Ahamdu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Kaduna, is presented. The initial management is conservative, followed later by multiple reconstructions.

RESULTS

NOMA thrives in children with poor nutritional status and/or compromised immune status. Aggressive wound debridement, antibiotic therapy and nutritional rehabilitation limited the spread of the orofacial tissue destruction and produced rapid wound healing.

CONCLUSION

The management of acute NOMA should be nonoperative; surgery is only indicated to debride the ulcer. Efforts to boost patient's immune and nutritional status limit further tissue destruction and produced satisfactory wound healing.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Maxillo-Facial, Ahamadu Bello University Teaching Hopsital, Zaria, Nigeria. adeolad@hotmail.comNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19661634

Citation

Adeola, D S., and A C. Obiadazie. "Protocol for Managing Acute Cancrum Oris in Children: an Experience in Five Cases." African Journal of Paediatric Surgery : AJPS, vol. 6, no. 2, 2009, pp. 77-81.
Adeola DS, Obiadazie AC. Protocol for managing acute cancrum oris in children: an experience in five cases. Afr J Paediatr Surg. 2009;6(2):77-81.
Adeola, D. S., & Obiadazie, A. C. (2009). Protocol for managing acute cancrum oris in children: an experience in five cases. African Journal of Paediatric Surgery : AJPS, 6(2), 77-81. https://doi.org/10.4103/0189-6725.54767
Adeola DS, Obiadazie AC. Protocol for Managing Acute Cancrum Oris in Children: an Experience in Five Cases. Afr J Paediatr Surg. 2009 Jul-Dec;6(2):77-81. PubMed PMID: 19661634.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Protocol for managing acute cancrum oris in children: an experience in five cases. AU - Adeola,D S, AU - Obiadazie,A C, PY - 2009/8/8/entrez PY - 2009/8/8/pubmed PY - 2009/12/23/medline SP - 77 EP - 81 JF - African journal of paediatric surgery : AJPS JO - Afr J Paediatr Surg VL - 6 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Acute cancrum oris (NOMA) is a major health concern in most parts of northern Nigeria, affecting children aged 2-9 years. The management of the acute phase/condition poses a great clinical challenge. We present our protocol for the management of acute NOMA in a referral health facility in northern Nigeria. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The management of five consecutive children with acute NOMA managed at the maxillo-facial department of Ahamdu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Kaduna, is presented. The initial management is conservative, followed later by multiple reconstructions. RESULTS: NOMA thrives in children with poor nutritional status and/or compromised immune status. Aggressive wound debridement, antibiotic therapy and nutritional rehabilitation limited the spread of the orofacial tissue destruction and produced rapid wound healing. CONCLUSION: The management of acute NOMA should be nonoperative; surgery is only indicated to debride the ulcer. Efforts to boost patient's immune and nutritional status limit further tissue destruction and produced satisfactory wound healing. SN - 0974-5998 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19661634/Protocol_for_managing_acute_cancrum_oris_in_children:_an_experience_in_five_cases_ L2 - http://www.afrjpaedsurg.org/article.asp?issn=0189-6725;year=2009;volume=6;issue=2;spage=77;epage=81;aulast=Adeola DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -