Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Centred egocentric, decentred egocentric, and allocentric spatial representations in the peripersonal space of congenital total blindness.
Perception. 2009; 38(5):679-93.P

Abstract

The distinction between different spatial representations in the peripersonal space was examined in two experiments by requiring sighted blindfolded and blind participants to remember the locations of objects haptically explored. In experiment 1, object relocation took place from either the same position as learning-with the same (centred egocentric condition) or 90 degrees-rotated (rotated egocentric condition) object array-or from a position different from the learning position (allocentric condition). Results revealed that, in both sighted and blind people, distance errors were higher in the allocentric and rotated conditions than in the centred egocentric condition, and that blind participants made more distance errors than sighted subjects only in the allocentric condition. Experiment 2 repeated rotated egocentric and allocentric conditions, while the centred egocentric condition was replaced by a decentred egocentric condition in which object relocation took place from the same position as learning (egocentric) but started from a decentred point. The decentred egocentric condition was found to remain significantly different from the rotated condition, but not from the allocentric condition. Moreover, blind participants performed less well in the allocentric condition, but were specifically impaired. Overall, our results confirm that different types of spatial constraints and representations, including the decentred egocentric one, can be distinguished in the peripersonal space and that blind people are as efficient as sighted in the egocentric and rotated conditions, but they encounter difficulties in recalling locations also in the peripersonal space, especially when an allocentric condition is required.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Università degli Studi Suor Orsola Benincasa, Corso Vittorio Emanuele 292, I 80135 Naples, Italy. emanuele.coluccia@unisob.na.itNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19662943

Citation

Coluccia, Emanuele, et al. "Centred Egocentric, Decentred Egocentric, and Allocentric Spatial Representations in the Peripersonal Space of Congenital Total Blindness." Perception, vol. 38, no. 5, 2009, pp. 679-93.
Coluccia E, Mammarella IC, Cornoldi C. Centred egocentric, decentred egocentric, and allocentric spatial representations in the peripersonal space of congenital total blindness. Perception. 2009;38(5):679-93.
Coluccia, E., Mammarella, I. C., & Cornoldi, C. (2009). Centred egocentric, decentred egocentric, and allocentric spatial representations in the peripersonal space of congenital total blindness. Perception, 38(5), 679-93.
Coluccia E, Mammarella IC, Cornoldi C. Centred Egocentric, Decentred Egocentric, and Allocentric Spatial Representations in the Peripersonal Space of Congenital Total Blindness. Perception. 2009;38(5):679-93. PubMed PMID: 19662943.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Centred egocentric, decentred egocentric, and allocentric spatial representations in the peripersonal space of congenital total blindness. AU - Coluccia,Emanuele, AU - Mammarella,Irene C, AU - Cornoldi,Cesare, PY - 2009/8/11/entrez PY - 2009/8/11/pubmed PY - 2010/1/28/medline SP - 679 EP - 93 JF - Perception JO - Perception VL - 38 IS - 5 N2 - The distinction between different spatial representations in the peripersonal space was examined in two experiments by requiring sighted blindfolded and blind participants to remember the locations of objects haptically explored. In experiment 1, object relocation took place from either the same position as learning-with the same (centred egocentric condition) or 90 degrees-rotated (rotated egocentric condition) object array-or from a position different from the learning position (allocentric condition). Results revealed that, in both sighted and blind people, distance errors were higher in the allocentric and rotated conditions than in the centred egocentric condition, and that blind participants made more distance errors than sighted subjects only in the allocentric condition. Experiment 2 repeated rotated egocentric and allocentric conditions, while the centred egocentric condition was replaced by a decentred egocentric condition in which object relocation took place from the same position as learning (egocentric) but started from a decentred point. The decentred egocentric condition was found to remain significantly different from the rotated condition, but not from the allocentric condition. Moreover, blind participants performed less well in the allocentric condition, but were specifically impaired. Overall, our results confirm that different types of spatial constraints and representations, including the decentred egocentric one, can be distinguished in the peripersonal space and that blind people are as efficient as sighted in the egocentric and rotated conditions, but they encounter difficulties in recalling locations also in the peripersonal space, especially when an allocentric condition is required. SN - 0301-0066 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19662943/Centred_egocentric_decentred_egocentric_and_allocentric_spatial_representations_in_the_peripersonal_space_of_congenital_total_blindness_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1068/p5942?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -