Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Diet-dependent net acid load and risk of incident hypertension in United States women.
Hypertension 2009; 54(4):751-5H

Abstract

Animal and human studies suggest a potential link between acid-base status and blood pressure. Contemporary Western diets yield a daily systemic acid load of varying amounts, yet the association with hypertension has never been explored. We prospectively examined the association between the diet-dependent net acid load (also known as the estimated net endogenous acid production) and the risk of incident hypertension among 87 293 women without a history of hypertension in the Nurses' Health Study II. We also used the ratio of animal protein intake to potassium intake as an alternative evaluation of diet-dependent net acid load. We identified 15 385 incident cases of hypertension during 995 239 person-years of follow-up. After adjusting for potential confounders, women in the top decile of estimated diet-dependent net acid load had an increased risk of hypertension (relative risk: 1.14; 95% CI: 1.05 to 1.24; P for trend=0.01) compared with women in the bottom decile. To test whether the association between estimated diet-dependent net acid load and hypertension is independent of its individual components, an additional adjustment for intakes of protein and potassium was made and resulted in a relative risk of 1.23 (95% CI: 1.08 to 1.41; P for trend=0.003) for the top decile of estimated diet-dependent net acid load. Results of the ratio of animal protein intake to potassium intake were similar with those of estimated diet-depend net acid load. In conclusion, a high diet-dependent net acid load is independently associated with a higher risk of incident hypertension.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Channing Laboratory/Renal Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 181 Longwood Ave., Boston, MA 02115, USA. nhlzh@channing.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19667248

Citation

Zhang, Luxia, et al. "Diet-dependent Net Acid Load and Risk of Incident Hypertension in United States Women." Hypertension (Dallas, Tex. : 1979), vol. 54, no. 4, 2009, pp. 751-5.
Zhang L, Curhan GC, Forman JP. Diet-dependent net acid load and risk of incident hypertension in United States women. Hypertension. 2009;54(4):751-5.
Zhang, L., Curhan, G. C., & Forman, J. P. (2009). Diet-dependent net acid load and risk of incident hypertension in United States women. Hypertension (Dallas, Tex. : 1979), 54(4), pp. 751-5. doi:10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.109.135582.
Zhang L, Curhan GC, Forman JP. Diet-dependent Net Acid Load and Risk of Incident Hypertension in United States Women. Hypertension. 2009;54(4):751-5. PubMed PMID: 19667248.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Diet-dependent net acid load and risk of incident hypertension in United States women. AU - Zhang,Luxia, AU - Curhan,Gary C, AU - Forman,John P, Y1 - 2009/08/10/ PY - 2009/8/12/entrez PY - 2009/8/12/pubmed PY - 2009/10/21/medline SP - 751 EP - 5 JF - Hypertension (Dallas, Tex. : 1979) JO - Hypertension VL - 54 IS - 4 N2 - Animal and human studies suggest a potential link between acid-base status and blood pressure. Contemporary Western diets yield a daily systemic acid load of varying amounts, yet the association with hypertension has never been explored. We prospectively examined the association between the diet-dependent net acid load (also known as the estimated net endogenous acid production) and the risk of incident hypertension among 87 293 women without a history of hypertension in the Nurses' Health Study II. We also used the ratio of animal protein intake to potassium intake as an alternative evaluation of diet-dependent net acid load. We identified 15 385 incident cases of hypertension during 995 239 person-years of follow-up. After adjusting for potential confounders, women in the top decile of estimated diet-dependent net acid load had an increased risk of hypertension (relative risk: 1.14; 95% CI: 1.05 to 1.24; P for trend=0.01) compared with women in the bottom decile. To test whether the association between estimated diet-dependent net acid load and hypertension is independent of its individual components, an additional adjustment for intakes of protein and potassium was made and resulted in a relative risk of 1.23 (95% CI: 1.08 to 1.41; P for trend=0.003) for the top decile of estimated diet-dependent net acid load. Results of the ratio of animal protein intake to potassium intake were similar with those of estimated diet-depend net acid load. In conclusion, a high diet-dependent net acid load is independently associated with a higher risk of incident hypertension. SN - 1524-4563 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19667248/Diet_dependent_net_acid_load_and_risk_of_incident_hypertension_in_United_States_women_ L2 - http://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.109.135582?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -