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Hamburger high in total, saturated and trans-fatty acids decreases HDL cholesterol and LDL particle diameter, and increases TAG, in mildly hypercholesterolaemic men.
Br J Nutr. 2010 Jan; 103(1):91-8.BJ

Abstract

The consumption of high-fat hamburger enriched with SFA and trans-fatty acids may increase risk factors for coronary vascular disease, whereas hamburger enriched with MUFA may have the opposite effect. Ten mildly hypercholesterolaemic men consumed five, 114 g hamburger patties per week for two consecutive phases. Participants consumed high-SFA hamburger (MUFA:SFA = 0.95; produced from pasture-fed cattle) for 5 weeks, consumed their habitual diets for 3 weeks and then consumed high-MUFA hamburger (MUFA:SFA = 1.31; produced from grain-fed cattle) for 5 weeks. These MUFA:SFA ratios were typical of ranges observed for retail ground beef. Relative to habitual levels and levels during the high-MUFA phase, the high-SFA hamburger: increased plasma palmitic acid, palmitoleic acid and TAG (P < 0.01); decreased HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) and LDL particle diameter percentile distributions (P < 0.05); and had no effect on LDL cholesterol or plasma glucose (P>0.10). Plasma palmitoleic acid was positively correlated with TAG (r 0.90), VLDL cholesterol (r 0.73) and the LDL:HDL ratio (r 0.45), and was negatively correlated with plasma HDL-C (r - 0.58), whereas plasma palmitic, stearic and oleic acids were negatively correlated with LDL particle diameter (all P <or= 0.05). Because plasma palmitoleic acid was derived from Delta9 desaturation of palmitic acid in liver, we conclude that alterations in hepatic stearoyl-CoA desaturase activity may have been responsible the variation in HDL-C and TAG caused by the high-SFA and high-MUFA hamburgers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19674491

Citation

Adams, Thaddeus H., et al. "Hamburger High in Total, Saturated and Trans-fatty Acids Decreases HDL Cholesterol and LDL Particle Diameter, and Increases TAG, in Mildly Hypercholesterolaemic Men." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 103, no. 1, 2010, pp. 91-8.
Adams TH, Walzem RL, Smith DR, et al. Hamburger high in total, saturated and trans-fatty acids decreases HDL cholesterol and LDL particle diameter, and increases TAG, in mildly hypercholesterolaemic men. Br J Nutr. 2010;103(1):91-8.
Adams, T. H., Walzem, R. L., Smith, D. R., Tseng, S., & Smith, S. B. (2010). Hamburger high in total, saturated and trans-fatty acids decreases HDL cholesterol and LDL particle diameter, and increases TAG, in mildly hypercholesterolaemic men. The British Journal of Nutrition, 103(1), 91-8. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114509991516
Adams TH, et al. Hamburger High in Total, Saturated and Trans-fatty Acids Decreases HDL Cholesterol and LDL Particle Diameter, and Increases TAG, in Mildly Hypercholesterolaemic Men. Br J Nutr. 2010;103(1):91-8. PubMed PMID: 19674491.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hamburger high in total, saturated and trans-fatty acids decreases HDL cholesterol and LDL particle diameter, and increases TAG, in mildly hypercholesterolaemic men. AU - Adams,Thaddeus H, AU - Walzem,Rosemary L, AU - Smith,Dana R, AU - Tseng,Stephen, AU - Smith,Stephen B, Y1 - 2009/08/13/ PY - 2009/8/14/entrez PY - 2009/8/14/pubmed PY - 2010/2/2/medline SP - 91 EP - 8 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br J Nutr VL - 103 IS - 1 N2 - The consumption of high-fat hamburger enriched with SFA and trans-fatty acids may increase risk factors for coronary vascular disease, whereas hamburger enriched with MUFA may have the opposite effect. Ten mildly hypercholesterolaemic men consumed five, 114 g hamburger patties per week for two consecutive phases. Participants consumed high-SFA hamburger (MUFA:SFA = 0.95; produced from pasture-fed cattle) for 5 weeks, consumed their habitual diets for 3 weeks and then consumed high-MUFA hamburger (MUFA:SFA = 1.31; produced from grain-fed cattle) for 5 weeks. These MUFA:SFA ratios were typical of ranges observed for retail ground beef. Relative to habitual levels and levels during the high-MUFA phase, the high-SFA hamburger: increased plasma palmitic acid, palmitoleic acid and TAG (P < 0.01); decreased HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) and LDL particle diameter percentile distributions (P < 0.05); and had no effect on LDL cholesterol or plasma glucose (P>0.10). Plasma palmitoleic acid was positively correlated with TAG (r 0.90), VLDL cholesterol (r 0.73) and the LDL:HDL ratio (r 0.45), and was negatively correlated with plasma HDL-C (r - 0.58), whereas plasma palmitic, stearic and oleic acids were negatively correlated with LDL particle diameter (all P <or= 0.05). Because plasma palmitoleic acid was derived from Delta9 desaturation of palmitic acid in liver, we conclude that alterations in hepatic stearoyl-CoA desaturase activity may have been responsible the variation in HDL-C and TAG caused by the high-SFA and high-MUFA hamburgers. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19674491/Hamburger_high_in_total_saturated_and_trans_fatty_acids_decreases_HDL_cholesterol_and_LDL_particle_diameter_and_increases_TAG_in_mildly_hypercholesterolaemic_men_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114509991516/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -