Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Rabies exposure in international travelers: do we miss the target?
Int J Infect Dis. 2010 Mar; 14(3):e243-6.IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Little data exist about the spatial distribution of the risk for travelers of being injured by a potentially rabid animal.

METHODS

Over the last 14 years, animal-associated injuries in 424 international travelers presenting to a travel medicine clinic in Marseille, southern France, were investigated.

RESULTS

The majority of cases were reported from North Africa (41.5%) and Asia (22.2%). Most countries where at-risk injuries occurred (Algeria, Morocco, Tunisia, Thailand, and Turkey) were those for which travelers do not usually seek advice at a specialized travel clinic, because these countries are not at risk for specific travel-associated diseases like malaria or yellow fever. The probability of travelers being attacked by each animal species varied significantly according to the destination country. Dogs were more frequently involved in Algeria, cats in Tunisia and the Middle East, and non-human primates in sub-Saharan Africa, Madagascar, and Asia.

CONCLUSIONS

We suggest that rabies pre-exposure vaccination should be offered to individuals traveling regularly to North Africa to visit their relatives and who are at high risk of exposure to potentially rabid animal attacks. Pre-travel advice when addressing rabies prevention should consider the specific epidemiology of animal-related injuries in the traveled country, as well as the traveler's characteristics. Travelers should be advised about which species of animal are potentially aggressive in their destination country so that they can more easily avoid risk-contacts.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Service des Maladies Infectieuses et Tropicales, Hôpital Nord, AP-HM, Chemin des Bourrelys, 13915 Marseille, Cedex 20, France.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19674923

Citation

Gautret, Philippe, et al. "Rabies Exposure in International Travelers: Do We Miss the Target?" International Journal of Infectious Diseases : IJID : Official Publication of the International Society for Infectious Diseases, vol. 14, no. 3, 2010, pp. e243-6.
Gautret P, Adehossi E, Soula G, et al. Rabies exposure in international travelers: do we miss the target? Int J Infect Dis. 2010;14(3):e243-6.
Gautret, P., Adehossi, E., Soula, G., Soavi, M. J., Delmont, J., Rotivel, Y., Brouqui, P., & Parola, P. (2010). Rabies exposure in international travelers: do we miss the target? International Journal of Infectious Diseases : IJID : Official Publication of the International Society for Infectious Diseases, 14(3), e243-6. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijid.2009.05.009
Gautret P, et al. Rabies Exposure in International Travelers: Do We Miss the Target. Int J Infect Dis. 2010;14(3):e243-6. PubMed PMID: 19674923.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Rabies exposure in international travelers: do we miss the target? AU - Gautret,Philippe, AU - Adehossi,Eric, AU - Soula,Georges, AU - Soavi,Marie-Josèphe, AU - Delmont,Jean, AU - Rotivel,Yolande, AU - Brouqui,Philippe, AU - Parola,Philippe, Y1 - 2009/08/12/ PY - 2008/12/08/received PY - 2009/03/13/revised PY - 2009/05/15/accepted PY - 2009/8/14/entrez PY - 2009/8/14/pubmed PY - 2010/7/2/medline SP - e243 EP - 6 JF - International journal of infectious diseases : IJID : official publication of the International Society for Infectious Diseases JO - Int J Infect Dis VL - 14 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Little data exist about the spatial distribution of the risk for travelers of being injured by a potentially rabid animal. METHODS: Over the last 14 years, animal-associated injuries in 424 international travelers presenting to a travel medicine clinic in Marseille, southern France, were investigated. RESULTS: The majority of cases were reported from North Africa (41.5%) and Asia (22.2%). Most countries where at-risk injuries occurred (Algeria, Morocco, Tunisia, Thailand, and Turkey) were those for which travelers do not usually seek advice at a specialized travel clinic, because these countries are not at risk for specific travel-associated diseases like malaria or yellow fever. The probability of travelers being attacked by each animal species varied significantly according to the destination country. Dogs were more frequently involved in Algeria, cats in Tunisia and the Middle East, and non-human primates in sub-Saharan Africa, Madagascar, and Asia. CONCLUSIONS: We suggest that rabies pre-exposure vaccination should be offered to individuals traveling regularly to North Africa to visit their relatives and who are at high risk of exposure to potentially rabid animal attacks. Pre-travel advice when addressing rabies prevention should consider the specific epidemiology of animal-related injuries in the traveled country, as well as the traveler's characteristics. Travelers should be advised about which species of animal are potentially aggressive in their destination country so that they can more easily avoid risk-contacts. SN - 1878-3511 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19674923/Rabies_exposure_in_international_travelers:_do_we_miss_the_target L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1201-9712(09)00207-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -