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Flaxseed oil supplementation increases plasma F1-phytoprostanes in healthy men.
J Nutr. 2009 Oct; 139(10):1890-5.JN

Abstract

Supplementation with eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has been reported to reduce lipid peroxidation products formed from arachidonic acid (F(2)-isoprostanes) in healthy humans, as well as in those under oxidative stress. alpha-Linolenic acid (ALA) is a precursor to EPA and DHA; however, its conversion in humans is thought to be inefficient. ALA can also undergo free radical oxidation, forming compounds known as F(1)-phytoprostanes, which are found in all plants and are in high concentrations in plant pollens. In this study, we examined the effect of ALA supplementation on plasma and urine F(1)-phytoprostane and F(2)-isoprostane concentrations in men. Thirty-six nonsmoking men, aged 20-65 y, were recruited from the general population and randomly allocated to consume 9 g/d of either flaxseed oil (62% ALA, 5.4 g/d) or olive oil (placebo) for 4 wk in a parallel design. At baseline and after 4 wk of supplementation, blood samples and a 24-h urine sample were collected for measurement of plasma and urinary F(1)-phytoprostanes and F(2)-isoprostanes and plasma fatty acids. Compared with the olive oil group, plasma phospholipid ALA was greater (P < 0.0001), as were F(1)-phytoprostanes in plasma (P = 0.049) and urine (P = 0.06) in the flaxseed oil group after 4 wk supplementation. Flaxseed oil did not affect plasma or urinary F(2)-isoprostanes. The greater plasma F(1)-phytoprostane concentration in the flaxseed oil group most likely resulted from the increased plasma concentration of the ALA substrate and/or the F(1)-phytoprostane content of the flaxseed oil. Future studies are needed to determine the physiological importance of increased plasma and urine F(1)-phytoprostanes and their relevance to heart disease prevention.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Western Australia, School of Medicine and Pharmacology, Cardiovascular Research Center, Royal Perth Hospital, 6001, Western Australia, Australia. anne.barden@uwa.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19675101

Citation

Barden, Anne E., et al. "Flaxseed Oil Supplementation Increases Plasma F1-phytoprostanes in Healthy Men." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 139, no. 10, 2009, pp. 1890-5.
Barden AE, Croft KD, Durand T, et al. Flaxseed oil supplementation increases plasma F1-phytoprostanes in healthy men. J Nutr. 2009;139(10):1890-5.
Barden, A. E., Croft, K. D., Durand, T., Guy, A., Mueller, M. J., & Mori, T. A. (2009). Flaxseed oil supplementation increases plasma F1-phytoprostanes in healthy men. The Journal of Nutrition, 139(10), 1890-5. https://doi.org/10.3945/jn.109.108316
Barden AE, et al. Flaxseed Oil Supplementation Increases Plasma F1-phytoprostanes in Healthy Men. J Nutr. 2009;139(10):1890-5. PubMed PMID: 19675101.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Flaxseed oil supplementation increases plasma F1-phytoprostanes in healthy men. AU - Barden,Anne E, AU - Croft,Kevin D, AU - Durand,Thierry, AU - Guy,Alexandre, AU - Mueller,Martin J, AU - Mori,Trevor A, Y1 - 2009/08/12/ PY - 2009/8/14/entrez PY - 2009/8/14/pubmed PY - 2009/10/7/medline SP - 1890 EP - 5 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J Nutr VL - 139 IS - 10 N2 - Supplementation with eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has been reported to reduce lipid peroxidation products formed from arachidonic acid (F(2)-isoprostanes) in healthy humans, as well as in those under oxidative stress. alpha-Linolenic acid (ALA) is a precursor to EPA and DHA; however, its conversion in humans is thought to be inefficient. ALA can also undergo free radical oxidation, forming compounds known as F(1)-phytoprostanes, which are found in all plants and are in high concentrations in plant pollens. In this study, we examined the effect of ALA supplementation on plasma and urine F(1)-phytoprostane and F(2)-isoprostane concentrations in men. Thirty-six nonsmoking men, aged 20-65 y, were recruited from the general population and randomly allocated to consume 9 g/d of either flaxseed oil (62% ALA, 5.4 g/d) or olive oil (placebo) for 4 wk in a parallel design. At baseline and after 4 wk of supplementation, blood samples and a 24-h urine sample were collected for measurement of plasma and urinary F(1)-phytoprostanes and F(2)-isoprostanes and plasma fatty acids. Compared with the olive oil group, plasma phospholipid ALA was greater (P < 0.0001), as were F(1)-phytoprostanes in plasma (P = 0.049) and urine (P = 0.06) in the flaxseed oil group after 4 wk supplementation. Flaxseed oil did not affect plasma or urinary F(2)-isoprostanes. The greater plasma F(1)-phytoprostane concentration in the flaxseed oil group most likely resulted from the increased plasma concentration of the ALA substrate and/or the F(1)-phytoprostane content of the flaxseed oil. Future studies are needed to determine the physiological importance of increased plasma and urine F(1)-phytoprostanes and their relevance to heart disease prevention. SN - 1541-6100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19675101/Flaxseed_oil_supplementation_increases_plasma_F1_phytoprostanes_in_healthy_men_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/jn.109.108316 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -